Civil Constitution of the Clergy


Civil Constitution of the Clergy
(July 12, 1790) Act, passed by the National Assembly during the French Revolution, that subordinated the Roman Catholic church in France to the state.

Under its provisions, enfranchised citizens would elect bishops and parish priests and the state would pay the clergy's wages. The act soon provoked opposition, and when the National Assembly ordered the clergy to take an oath supporting the Civil Constitution, many refused. The resulting schism within the French church caused many devout Catholics to turn against the Revolution.

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France
French  Constitution Civile Du Clergé 

      (July 12, 1790), during the French Revolution, an attempt to reorganize the Roman Catholic Church in France on a national basis. It caused a schism within the French Church and made many devout Catholics turn against the Revolution.

      There was a need to create a new administrative and financial framework for the French Church after the Revolutionary governing body, the National Assembly, in its reforming efforts, had abolished the collection of tithes and had confiscated church lands. The main features of the proposed Civil Constitution of the Clergy were to reduce the number of bishops from 135 to 83, to have each diocese correspond to a département (the basic territorial administrative unit established by the Assembly), to have enfranchised citizens elect bishops and parish priests, and to have the state pay the clergy's wages.

      Although passed by the Assembly with a large majority on July 12, 1790, and formally sanctioned by King Louis XVI on August 24, the Civil Constitution soon provoked much opposition. Many clerics disagreed with its strict subordination of the church to the state and with the limitation of the pope's jurisdiction to spiritual affairs. On Nov. 27, 1790, the National Constituent Assembly ordered the clergy to take an oath declaring their support of the nation's constitution and thus, indirectly, of the reorganization of the church. Priests were faced with the dilemma of accepting the Civil Constitution (which by then had been condemned by a number of bishops) or of losing their parishes. Only seven bishops and about one-half of the parish priests took the oath. Thus, the church in France was split between the nonjurors (refractory priests) and the jurors (constitutional priests). A continuation of the conflict became unavoidable when Pope Pius VI condemned the Civil Constitution in the spring of 1791. The various Revolutionary governments of the early 1790s took harsh measures against the nonjuring clergy as enemies of the state, although in some areas, especially in western France, they were supported by the people. The schism ended under Napoleon's rule with the Concordat of 1801.

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Universalium. 2010.

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