Chicago literary renaissance


Chicago literary renaissance
Flourishing of literary activity in Chicago с 1912–25.

Its leading writers
realistically depicted the contemporary urban environment, condemning the loss of traditional rural values in the increasingly industrialized and materialistic American society. Associated with the period were the Little Theatre, an outlet for young playwrights; the Little Room, a literary group; and magazines such as The Dial, Poetry, and The Little Review. The renaissance also encompassed a revitalization of newspaper journalism as a literary medium.

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▪ literary period
      the flourishing of literary activity in Chicago during the period from approximately 1912 to 1925. The leading writers of this renaissance—Theodore Dreiser, Sherwood Anderson, Edgar Lee Masters, and Carl Sandburg—realistically depicted the contemporary urban environment, decrying the loss of traditional rural values in the increasingly industrialized and materialistic American society and the failure of the romantic promise that hard work would automatically bring material and spiritual rewards. Most of these writers were originally from small Middle Western towns and were deeply affected by the Regionalism of the 1890s that foreshadowed the Realism of 20th-century literature. The renaissance also encompassed the revitalization of journalism as a literary medium; writers such as Floyd Dell, Anderson, Dreiser, and Sandburg all were associated at one time with Chicago newspapers. The Little Theatre established in 1912 by Maurice Browne became an important outlet for the creative talents of young playwrights.

      The first stirrings of the Chicago renaissance were felt after the World's Columbian Exhibition of 1893, an event that attracted young Middle Western writers to the city. The Little Room, a literary group that included both artists and patrons of the arts, encouraged literary activity. The Dial magazine, established in 1880, grew to be a respected literary organ. Henry Blake Fuller and Robert Herrick, who belonged to the genteel tradition, wrote several novels that foreshadowed the later Realistic novels of Dreiser and Anderson. Hamlin Garland, already famous for novels on the bleakness of Middle Western rural life, was associated briefly with the Little Room.

      The appearance of Theodore Dreiser's Naturalistic novel Sister Carrie (published 1900; suppressed until 1912), Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio (1919), Edgar Lee Masters' collection of poetic epitaphs, Spoon River Anthology (1915), and Carl Sandburg's Chicago Poems (1916) marked the height of the Chicago renaissance. Two Chicago literary magazines—Poetry: A Magazine of Verse, founded 1912 by Harriet Monroe (Monroe, Harriet) (q.v.) and the Little Review (1914–29), founded by Margaret Anderson—published exciting new verse by such local poets as Vachel Lindsay, Edgar Lee Masters, and Carl Sandburg. Floyd Dell (Dell, Floyd), a journalist associated with the Friday Literary Review (1908), the weekly literary supplement to the Chicago Evening Post, was the centre of a vital literary circle that included Dreiser, Sherwood Anderson, Margaret Anderson, and Monroe.

      After World War I the writers began to disperse, and by the Great Depression of the 1930s the Chicago literary renaissance had ended.

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Universalium. 2010.

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