Cambridge Platonists


Cambridge Platonists
Group of 17th-century British philosophic and religious thinkers.

Led by Benjamin Whichcote (1609–1683), it included Ralph Cudworth and Henry More (1614–1687) at Cambridge and Joseph Glanvill (1636–1680) at Oxford. Educated as Puritans, they reacted against the Calvinist emphasis on the arbitrariness of divine sovereignty. In their eyes, Thomas Hobbes and the Calvinists erred in making the voluntarist assumption (see voluntarism) that morality consists in obeying the will of a sovereign. Morality, they asserted, is essentially rational, and the good person's virtue is grounded in an understanding of the eternal and immutable nature of goodness, which not even God can alter through sovereign power.

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▪ English philosophical group
      group of 17th-century English philosophic and religious thinkers who hoped to reconcile Christian ethics with Renaissance humanism, religion with the new science, and faith with rationality. Their leader was Benjamin Whichcote, who expounded in his sermons the Christian humanism that united the group. His principal disciples at the University of Cambridge were Ralph Cudworth, Henry More, and John Smith; Joseph Glanvill was a University of Oxford convert. Nathanael Culverwel, Richard Cumberland, and the mystic Peter Sterry at Cambridge and John Norris at Oxford were influenced by Cambridge Platonism without wholly accepting its moral and religious ideals.

      Educated as Puritans, the Cambridge Platonists reacted against the Calvinist emphasis on the arbitrariness of divine sovereignty. In their eyes, Thomas Hobbes, the political philosopher, and the Calvinists both erred in supposing that morality consists in obedience to a will. Morality, the Platonists said, is essentially rational; and the good man's love of goodness is at the same time an understanding of its nature, which not even God can alter through sovereign power. Against both William Laud, archbishop of Canterbury, and the Calvinists, they denied that ritual, church government, or detailed dogmas are essentials of Christianity. To be a Christian is to participate in divine wisdom and to be free to choose whatever forms of religious organization prove helpful. The width of their tolerance won them the nickname “latitude men”; and they were often condemned as Unitarians or atheists because they stressed morality so far above dogma.

      Their metaphysics derives from Renaissance Platonism, which interpreted Plato in a Neoplatonic light. They learned much from Descartes's critique of Empiricism; but, fearing that the new “mechanical” theories might undermine the religious world view, they supported (against Descartes) a teleological interpretation of natural processes.

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Universalium. 2010.

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