Būyid dynasty


Būyid dynasty
or Buwayhid dynasty

(945–1055) Muslim Shīʽite dynasty founded by three sons of Būyeh, a Daylamite (north Persian) fisherman.

They captured Baghdad in 945, and each brother took a portion of territory. After they died, one Būyid leader, ʽAḍūd al-Dawlah, consolidated control (977) and enlarged the Būyid domain. From 983 the territories were split among family members. The dynasty ended when the Turkic Seljūq dynasty took Baghdad in 1055. Būyid art maintained its influence throughout the Seljūq reign; Būyid silverwork is notable.

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also called  Buwayhid 

      (945–1055), Islāmic dynasty of pronounced Iranian and Shīʿī character that provided native rule in western Iran and Iraq in the period between the Arab and Turkish conquests. Of Daylamite (northern Iranian) origin, the line was founded by the three sons of Būyeh (or Buwayh), ʿAlī, Ḥasan, and Aḥmad.

      ʿAlī, appointed governor of Karaj about 930 by the Daylamite leader Mardāvīz ebn Zeyār, seized Isfahan and Fārs, while Ḥasan and Aḥmad took Jibāl, Khūzestān, and Kermān (935–936). In December 945 Aḥmad occupied the ʿAbbāsid capital of Baghdad as amīr al-umarāʾ (commander in chief) and, reducing the Sunnī caliphs to puppet status, established Būyid rule (January 946). Thereafter the brothers were known by their honorific titles of ʿImād ad-Dawlah (ʿAlī), Rukn ad-Dawlah (Ḥasan), and Muʿizz ad-Dawlah (Aḥmad).

      The dynasty's power, subsequently fragmented among family members and provinces, was consolidated briefly during the reign of Aḍud ad-Dawlahʿ (949–983), who established himself as sole ruler (by 977), adding Oman, Ṭabaristān, and Jorjān to the original domains.

      The Būyid state was then at its peak; it engaged in public works, building hospitals and the Band-e amīr (Emir's Dam) across the Kūr River near Shīrāz; it had relations with the Sāmānids, Ḥamdānids, Byzantines, and Fāṭimids; it patronized artists, notably the poets al-Mutanabbī and Ferdowsī. The Shīʿī nature of the state was manifest in the inauguration of popular and passionate observance of Shīʿī festivals and the encouragement of pilgrimages to the holy places of an-Najaf and Karbalāʾ in Iraq.

      The major cultural centres of the Būyids were the cities of Rayy and Nayin, in Iran, and Baghdad, in Iraq. The Persian character of Būyid art was deep enough to flavour the art of that part of the world through the reign of the Seljuqs until the Mongol invasions of the 13th century.

      Būyids were quite fond of metalwork, particularly fine silverwork. They often employed Sāsānian (pre-Islāmic Persian) techniques and motifs: a typical decoration consists of a seated figure surrounded with wild animals, birds, and musicians, depicted in the highly stylized Sāsānian tradition.

      Būyid pottery, usually called Gabrī ware, is a red-bodied earthenware covered with a white slip (liquified clay washed over the body before firing). Designs were executed by scratching through the slip to reveal the red body beneath. Yellowish or green lead glazes were used. Some pieces were decorated with linear patterns, others with elaborate representational designs, which often included mythological figures such as birds and quadrupeds with human faces. Some of the earliest extant of these pieces illustrate stories from the Shāh-nāmeh (“Book of Kings”), the Persian national epic by the poet Ferdowsī (died 1020).

      After the death of ʿAḍud ad-Dawlah, a slackening economy, dissention in the army, and general Būyid disunity hastened the dynasty's decline. In 1055, the last Būyid ruler, Abū Naṣr al-Mālik ar-Raḥīm, was deposed by the Seljuq Toghrïl Beg.

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Universalium. 2010.

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