Bakhtyārī


Bakhtyārī
or Bakhtiyārī or Bakhtiārī

Any member of a community of nomadic pastoral tent dwellers of western Iran.

They speak a dialect of Luri (a language related to Modern Persian) and are mostly Shīʽite Muslims. Their two tribal groups are the Chahār Lang and Haft Lang; the position of leader of all the Bakhtyārī alternates every two years between the chiefs of the two tribal groups. Many chiefs have been influential in national public affairs and have held office. Bakhtyārī women are normally better-educated and freer than other Muslim women in Iran.

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people
also spelled  Bakhtiyārī,  

      one of the nomad peoples of Iran; its chiefs have been among the greatest tribal leaders in Iran and have long been influential in Persian politics. The Bakhtyārī population of approximately 880,000 occupies roughly 25,000 square miles (65,000 square km) of plains and mountains in western Iran. They speak the Lurī dialect of Persian and are Shīʿite Muslims.

      Many of the Bakhtyārī are nomadic, pastoral tent dwellers who are dependent on their flocks of sheep, goats, and cattle. They migrate their flocks 150 miles each year between their winter pastures in the plains and the summer pastures of the mountains. Agricultural products are mainly obtained by trade or as tax from dependent villages. There has been some urbanization among the Bakhtyārī resulting from the oil industry.

      The Bakhtyārī are divided into two main tribal groups, the Chahār Lang (“Four Legs”) and the Haft Lang (“Seven Legs”). Each of these groups is controlled by a single chiefly family that holds extensive political power and owns sizable herds and farmlands. The position of khān, or paramount leader, of the Bakhtyārī is held for two years by the chief of the Haft Lang, with the chief of the Chahār Lang as his īlbeg, or deputy. For the next two years the two chiefs exchange their posts with each other.

      Bakhtyārī chiefs have long been influential in Iranian politics. In 1909 Bakhtyārī tribesmen under the Haft Lang chief Sardar Assad captured Tehrān in their successful campaign to press for constitutional reforms in Iran. Many Bakhtyārī have held prominent public offices since then, including governorates of provinces and important ministerial posts in the central government.

      Bakhtyārī women have long enjoyed a high degree of freedom that is atypical of Muslim women elsewhere. The daughters of tribal leaders are normally given at least an elementary education.

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Universalium. 2010.