Armenian massacres


Armenian massacres
Murder and expulsion of Turkish Armenians by the Ottoman Empire under Abdülhamid II in 1894–96 and by the Young Turk government in 1915–16.

In 1894, when the Armenians began agitating for territorial autonomy and protesting against high taxes, Ottoman troops and Kurdish tribesmen killed thousands. In 1896, hoping to call attention to their plight, Armenian revolutionaries seized the Ottoman Bank in Istanbul. Mobs of Muslim Turks, abetted by elements of the government, killed more than 50,000 Armenians in response. Sporadic killings occurred over the next two decades. In response to Russia's use of Armenian troops against the Ottomans in World War I (1914–18), the government deported 1.75 million Armenians south to Syria and Mesopotamia, in the course of which some 600,000 Armenians were killed or died of starvation.

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▪ Turkish-Armenian history
      series of brutal campaigns conducted against the Armenian subjects of the Ottoman Empire by Sultan Abdülhamid II in 1894–96 and by the Young Turk (Young Turks) government in 1915–16.

      It is estimated that nearly two million Christian Armenians lived in the Ottoman Empire by the late 1880s. The Armenians in the eastern provinces at that time, encouraged by Russia, began promoting Armenian territorial autonomy. As the movement grew, various political groups were organized, culminating in the formation of two revolutionary parties called Hënchak (“The Bell”) and Dashnaktsutyun (“Union”) in 1887 and 1890, respectively. At the same time, Abdülhamid, intent on suppressing all separatist sentiments in the empire, drastically raised taxes on the Armenians and aroused nationalistic feelings and resentment against them among the neighbouring Kurds (Kurd). This gave Armenian radicals a pretext to revolt. When the Armenians in Sasun refused to pay the oppressive taxes, Turkish troops and Kurdish tribesmen killed thousands of them and burned their villages (1894).

      In the hope of calling attention to their cause, Armenian revolutionaries staged another demonstration two years later: they seized the Ottoman Bank in Istanbul. In the mayhem that followed, more than 50,000 Armenians were killed by mobs of Muslim Turks whose actions were apparently coordinated by government troops.

      The last and deadliest of the massacres occurred during World War I (1914–18). Armenians from the Caucasus region of the Russian Empire formed volunteer battalions to help the Russian army against the Turks. Early in 1915 these battalions recruited Turkish Armenians from behind the Turkish lines. In response, the Turkish government ordered the deportation of about 1,750,000 Armenians to Syria and Mesopotamia. In the course of this forced exodus, about 600,000 Armenians died of starvation or were killed by Turkish soldiers and police while en route in the desert. (See Researcher's Note: Armenian massacres.) Hundreds of thousands more were forced into exile.

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Universalium. 2010.