Anglo-Saxon literature


Anglo-Saxon literature
Literature written in Old English с 650–с 1100.

Anglo-Saxon poetry survives almost entirely in four manuscripts. Beowulf is the oldest surviving Germanic epic and the longest Old English poem; other great works include The Wanderer, The Seafarer, The Battle of Maldon, and the Dream of the Rood. The poetry is alliterative; one of its features is the kenning, a metaphorical phrase used in place of a common noun (e.g., "swan road" for "sea"). Notable prose includes the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, a historical record begun about the time of King Alfred's reign (871–899) and continuing for more than three centuries. See also Caedmon; Cynewulf.

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      Literature written in Old English (Old English language) c. 650–c. 1100. Anglo-Saxon poetry survives almost entirely in four manuscripts. Beowulf is the oldest surviving Germanic epic and the longest Old English poem; other great works include The Wanderer, The Seafarer, The Battle of Maldon, and the Dream of the Rood. The poetry is alliterative; one of its features is the kenning, a metaphorical phrase used in place of a common noun (e.g., “swan road” for “sea”). Notable prose includes the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, a historical record begun about the time of King Alfred's reign (871–899) and continuing for more than three centuries. See also Caedmon; Cynewulf.

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Universalium. 2010.

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