Abū Bakr


Abū Bakr
died Aug. 23, 634, Medina

One of the close Companions of the Prophet Muhammad and the first Muslim caliph.

Some Muslim traditions say he was the first male convert to Islam after Muhammad. He became caliph after Muhammad's death in 632, and during his two years in that office he consolidated central Arabia under Muslim control, engaging in the wars of apostasy (riddah). He also realized the urgency of expanding the regions under Muslim control in order to maintain peace among Arab tribes.

* * *

▪ Muslim caliph
also called  al-Ṣiddīq (Arabic: “the Upright”) 
born c. 573
died August 23, 634
  Muhammad's closest companion and adviser, who succeeded to the Prophet's political and administrative functions, thereby initiating the office of the caliphate.

      Of a minor clan of the ruling merchant tribe of Quraysh at Mecca, Abū Bakr purportedly was the first male convert to Islam (Islāmic world), but this view is doubted by a majority of Muslim historians. Abū Bakr's prominence in the early Muslim community was clearly marked by Muhammad's marriage to his young daughter ʿĀʾishah and again by Muhammad's choosing Abū Bakr as his companion on the journey to Medina (the Hijrah [Hegira], 622). In Medina he was Muhammad's chief adviser (622–632) but functioned mainly in conducting the pilgrimage to Mecca in 631 and leading the public prayers in Medina during Muhammad's last illness.

      On Muhammad's death (June 8, 632), the Muslims of Medina resolved the crisis of succession by accepting Abū Bakr as the first khalīfat rasūl Allāh (“deputy [or successor] of the Prophet of God,” or caliph). In his rule (632–634), he suppressed the tribal political and religious uprisings known as the riddah (“apostasy”), thereby bringing central Arabia under Muslim control. Then by undertaking direct expansion from Arabia into Iraq and Syria, he began the Muslim conquests.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Abū Bakr — Abu Bakr Abdallah ibn Abi Quhafa as Siddiq (arabisch ‏أبو بكر عبد الله بن أبي قحافة الصديق‎, DMG Abū Bakr ʿAbd Allāh b. Abī Quḥāfa aṣ Ṣiddīq; (* 573 in Mekka; † 23. August 634 in Medina) war der erste der vier „rechtgeleiteten“ Kalifen, der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Abu Bakr II. — Abu Bakr II. († 1346) war Kalif der Hafsiden in Ifriqiya (1318 1346). Abu Bakr II. übernahm 1318 die Herrschaft im Hafsidenreich. Ihm gelang nach längeren Kämpfen mit anderen Thronanwärtern und den Beduinen die Befriedung des Reichs. Auch konnte… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • ABU BAKR — AB 樓 BAKR (570 env. 634) Premier calife musulman, ami, beau père et successeur du Prophète Mahomet ‘Abd All h, Ab Bakr reçut le surnom de ‘At 稜q (affranchi), puis celui d’al Sidd 稜q (le crédule), parce qu’il aurait été le premier à avoir cru… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Abu Bakr — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Abu Bakr as Siddiq Obtenido de Abu Bakr …   Wikipedia Español

  • Abu Bakr II — was the ninth mansa of the Mali Empire. He succeeded his nephew Mansa Mohammed ibn Gao and preceded Kankan Musa I. Abubakari II appears to have abdicated his throne in order to explore the limits of the ocean ; however, his expedition never… …   Wikipedia

  • Abu-Bakr — [ä bo͞o′ bek′ərä bo͞o′ bä′kər] A.D. 573 634; successor of Mohammed & 1st caliph of Islam (A.D. 632 634): father of Aisha: also Abu Bekr [ä bo͞o′ bek′ər] …   English World dictionary

  • Abu Bakr — For other people with the name, see Abu Bakr (name). Abu Bakr Caliph Abu Bakr s empire at its peak, 634. Khalifat ul Rasūl (Prophet s successor) …   Wikipedia

  • Abu Bakr — Abou Bakr Religion religions abrahamiques : judaïsme · christianisme · islam …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Abû Bakr — Abou Bakr Religion religions abrahamiques : judaïsme · christianisme · islam …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Abu Bakr — Altpersische Miniatur: Die Anwesenden in Sakifa schwören Abu Bakr den Treueid. Rechts neben ihm sitzt Umar, der seine Wahl ermöglicht hatte Abu Bakr Abdallah ibn Abi Quhafa as Siddiq (arabisch ‏أبو بكر عبد الله بن أبي قحافة الصديق‎, DMG Abū… …   Deutsch Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.