yeast


yeast
yeastless, adj.yeastlike, adj.
/yeest/, n.
1. any of various small, single-celled fungi of the phylum Ascomycota that reproduce by fission or budding, the daughter cells often remaining attached, and that are capable of fermenting carbohydrates into alcohol and carbon dioxide.
2. any of several yeasts of the genus Saccharomyces, used in brewing alcoholic beverages, as a leaven in baking breads, and in pharmacology as a source of vitamins and proteins. Cf. bottom yeast, brewer's yeast, top yeast.
3. spume; foam.
4. ferment; agitation.
5. something that causes ferment or agitation.
v.i.
6. to ferment.
7. to be covered with froth.
[bef. 1000; ME ye(e)st (n.), OE gist, gyst; c. D gist, G Gischt yeast, foam, ON jastr yeast, Gk zestós boiled, Skt yásati (it) boils]

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Any of certain economically important and usually single-celled fungi (see fungus), most of which are classified as ascomycetes.

Found worldwide in soils and on plant surfaces, yeasts are especially abundant in sugary mediums such as flower nectar and fruits. The types commonly used in the production of bread, beer, and wine are selected strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae; the small cakes and packets used contain billions of individual yeast cells, each of which can ferment approximately its own weight of glucose per hour. Dried yeast is 50% protein and is rich in B vitamins; brewer's yeast is sometimes taken as a vitamin supplement. Some yeasts are mild to dangerous pathogens of humans and other animals. Candida albicans, for example, irritates oral and vaginal linings, and Histoplasma and Blastomyces cause persistent lung infections.

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      any of certain economically important single-celled fungi (kingdom Fungi), most of which are in the phylum Ascomycota, only a few being Basidiomycota. Yeasts are found worldwide in soils and on plant surfaces and are especially abundant in sugary mediums such as flower nectar and fruits. There are hundreds of varieties of ascomycete yeasts; the types commonly used in the production of bread, beer, and wine are selected strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The small cakes and packets of yeast used in food- and beverage-processing contain billions of individual yeast cells, each about 0.003 inch (0.075 mm) in diameter.

      Yeasts reproduce asexually by budding: a small bump protrudes from a parent cell, enlarges, matures, and detaches. A few yeasts reproduce by fission, the parent cell dividing into two equal cells. Some yeasts are mild to dangerous pathogens of humans and other animals (e.g., Candida albicans, Histoplasma, Blastomyces). Torula is a genus of wild yeasts that are imperfect, never forming sexual spores.

      In food manufacture, yeast is used to cause fermentation and leavening. The fungi feed on sugars, producing alcohol (ethanol) and carbon dioxide; in beer and wine manufacture the former is the desired product, in baking, the latter. In sparkling wines and beer some of the carbon dioxide is retained in the finished beverage. The alcohol produced in bread making is driven off when the dough is baked. The fermentation of wine is initiated by naturally occurring yeasts present in the vineyards. One yeast cell can ferment approximately its own weight of glucose per hour.

      Yeast is 50 percent protein and is a rich source of vitamins B1, B2, niacin, and folic acid. Brewer's yeast is sometimes eaten as a vitamin supplement.

      In commercial production, selected strains of yeast are fed a solution of molasses, mineral salts, and ammonia. When growth ceases, the yeast is separated from the nutrient solution, washed, and packaged. Yeast for baking is sold in compressed cakes containing starch or in a dry granular form mixed with cornmeal.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Yeast — of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae Scientific classification Domain …   Wikipedia

  • Yeast — Yeast, n. [OE. [yogh]eest, [yogh]est, AS. gist; akin to D. gest, gist, G. gischt, g[ a]scht, OHG. jesan, jerian, to ferment, G. gischen, g[ a]schen, g[ a]hren, Gr. ? boiled, zei^n to boil, Skr. yas. [root]111.] [1913 Webster] 1. The foam, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • yeast — or yeast plant [yēst] n. [ME yest < OE gist, akin to Ger gischt, spray, froth & OHG jesan, to ferment < IE base * yes , to foam, boil up > Gr zein, to boil, seethe] 1. any of various single celled ascomycetous fungi in which little or no …   English World dictionary

  • yeast|y — «YEES tee», adjective, yeast|i|er, yeast|i|est. 1. of, containing, or resembling yeast. 2. frothy or foamy: »yeasty waves. 3 …   Useful english dictionary

  • yeast — yeast; yeast·i·ly; yeast·i·ness; …   English syllables

  • yeast — [ jist ] noun uncount a white substance used for making bread rise or for making beer ╾ yeast|y adjective …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • yeast — (n.) O.E. gist yeast, common West Germanic (Cf. M.H.G. gest, Ger. Gischt foam, froth, O.H.G. jesan, Ger. gären to ferment ), from PIE *jes boil, foam, froth (Cf. Skt. yasyati boils, seethes, Gk. zein to boil, Welsh …   Etymology dictionary

  • yeast — см. Приложение 1 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • yeast — yeast. См. дрожжи. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • yeast — is the colloquial name for members of the fungal families, ascomycetes, basidiomycetes and imperfect fungi, that tend to be unicellular for the greater part of their life cycle. Commercially important yeasts include Saccharomyces cerevisiae ;… …   Dictionary of molecular biology

  • yeast — [ji:st] n [U] [: Old English; Origin: gist] a type of ↑fungus used for producing alcohol in beer and wine, and for making bread rise >yeasty adj ▪ a yeasty taste …   Dictionary of contemporary English


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