Wounded Knee


Wounded Knee
a village in SW South Dakota: site of a massacre of about 300 Oglala Sioux Indians on Dec. 29, 1890.

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Hamlet and creek in southwestern South Dakota, the site of two conflicts between the Sioux Indians and the U.S. government.

In 1890 the Sioux had been inspired by the Ghost Dance movement to take up arms and reclaim their heritage, but federal military intervention quelled the rebellion. On December 29 a young brave became involved in a scuffle while surrendering, and a trooper was killed. Soldiers fired at the Indians, killing more than 200 men, women, and children. Thirty soldiers also died. The so-called Battle of Wounded Knee is regarded as the final episode in the conquest of the North American Indian. In 1973 some 200 members of the American Indian Movement took the reservation hamlet by force, declared it an independent nation, and vowed to stay until the government agreed to address Indian grievances; a siege by federal marshals ended when the Indians surrendered in exchange for a promise of negotiations.

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      hamlet and creek on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in southwestern South Dakota, U.S. It was the site of two conflicts between North American Indians and representatives of the U.S. government.

      On Dec. 29, 1890, more than 200 Sioux men, women, and children were massacred by U.S. troops in what has been called the Battle of Wounded Knee, an episode that concluded the conquest of the North American Indian. Reaching out for some hope of salvation from hard conditions, such as semistarvation caused by reduction in the size of their reservation in the late 1880s, the Teton Sioux responded affirmatively to Wovoka, a Paiute prophet who promised the disappearance of the white man and a return of native lands and buffalo if certain rites and dances were performed. These rites, known as the Ghost Dance (q.v.), caused alarm among whites and led to federal military intervention. The army subdued the Ghost Dance movement, but Chief Sitting Bull was killed by reservation police while being arrested (December 14), and a few hundred Sioux left their reservation at Pine Ridge, seeking to hide in the Badlands. Technically classified as hostiles because they had left the reservation, the Indians gathered around Chief Big Foot (who was dying of pneumonia) but surrendered quietly to pursuing troops of the 7th Cavalry on the night of December 28. Following an overnight encampment near Wounded Knee Creek, the Indians were surrounded and were nearly disarmed when a scuffle broke out over a young brave's new rifle. A shot was fired from within the group of struggling men, and a trooper fell. From close range the soldiers, supported by machine guns, fired into the Indians, whose only arms were the clubs and knives that they had hidden in blankets. Fleeing Indians were pursued, and some were killed miles from the camp. Although the number of Indian dead is unknown (the Indians removed some of the dead later), 144 Indians, including 44 women and 16 children, were buried in a mass grave the following spring when the weather permitted the army to return. About 30 soldiers were killed during the hostilities.

      On Feb. 27, 1973, some 200 members of the American Indian Movement (AIM), led by Russell Means and Dennis Banks, took the reservation hamlet of Wounded Knee by force, declared it the “Independent Oglala Sioux Nation,” and vowed to stay until the U.S. government met AIM demands for a change in tribal leaders, a review of all Indian treaties, and a U.S. Senate investigation of treatment of Indians in general. The Indians were immediately surrounded by federal marshals, and a siege began, ending on May 8, when the Indians surrendered their arms and evacuated Wounded Knee in exchange for a promise of negotiations on Indian grievances. Two Indians were killed and one federal marshal was seriously wounded during the siege, which alternated between negotiation and exchanges of gunfire.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Wounded Knee —   [ wuːndɪd niː], Weiler und Bach (»Creek«) in der Indianerreservation Pine Ridge im südwestlichen South Dakota, USA. In den Bergen beim Wounded Knee Creek brachen amerikanische Truppen am 29. 12. 1890 den letzten Widerstand der Dakota… …   Universal-Lexikon

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  • Wounded Knee — Wounded Knee, Battle of the last important battle between the US army and the Native Americans, which took place at Wounded Knee Creek in South Dakota. US soldiers killed almost 200 Sioux people, including women and children, and the battle… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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  • Wounded Knee — a village in SW South Dakota: site of a massacre of about 300 Oglala Sioux Indians on Dec. 29, 1890. * * * Wounded Knee [Wounded Knee] a small river in the US state of ↑South Dakota where US soldiers killed more than 200 Native American men,… …   Useful english dictionary

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