woodcock


woodcock
/wood"kok'/, n., pl. woodcocks, (esp. collectively) woodcock for 1, 2.
1. either of two plump, short-legged migratory game birds of variegated brown plumage, the Eurasian Scolopax rusticola and the smaller American Philohela minor.
2. any of various pileated or ivory-billed woodpeckers.
3. Archaic. a simpleton.
[bef. 1050; ME wodecok, OE wuducoc. See WOOD1, COCK1]

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Any of five species (family Scolopacidae) of plump, sharp-billed migratory birds of damp, dense woodlands in North America, Europe, and Asia.

With eyes set far back on the head, a woodcock has a 360° field of vision. The buffy-brown, mottled plumage provides camouflage. A solitary bird, most active at dusk, it drums its feet to coax earthworms to the surface and then extracts them with its long, forceps-like bill; it may eat twice its weight in worms each day. The female American woodcock (Scolopax,or Philohela, minor) is about 11 in. (28 cm) long; the male is slightly smaller. The male's striking courtship display includes a long, repeated spiraling and dropping sequence. Woodcocks have been popular game birds.

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bird
      any of five species of squat-bodied, long-billed birds of damp, dense woodlands, allied to the snipes in the waterbird family Scolopacidae (order Charadriiformes). The woodcock is a startling game bird: crouched among dead leaves, well camouflaged by its buffy-brown, mottled plumage, a woodcock remains motionless until almost stepped upon and then takes off in an explosive movement. With its eyes set farther back on the head than those of any other bird, a woodcock has a 360° field of vision. The ear opening is located below, rather than behind, the eye socket.

      A solitary bird that is most active at dusk, the woodcock lives chiefly on earthworms; it attracts the worms to the suface by drumming with its feet and then extracts them from the ground with its long, sensitive bill, which opens at the tip like a forceps. This feeding habit makes it necessary for woodcocks to migrate; they leave an area as soon as the ground starts to freeze. A single bird may eat twice its weight, or about 450 g (1 pound), in worms per day.

      Woodcock nest in early spring. The female alone incubates the clutch of about four eggs, laid in a leaf nest, often at the foot of a tree. If alarmed, the female may fly off, carrying a chick between her legs. The young reach full size within a month.

      The female American woodcock (Scolopax, or Philohela, minor) is about 28 cm (11 inches) long, including the bill. Her mate is slightly smaller. The wings are very rounded, and the outermost wing feathers are attenuated to produce vibratory sounds during flight, apparently at will. The male's aerial song, a sweet and varied whistling, accompanies his courtship display—a spiraling flight upward to 60–90 m (200–300 feet) followed by a fluttering drop back to the starting point. The display takes place at dusk, and the soaring and dropping sequence may be performed repeatedly for a period of 30 minutes. The American woodcock breeds in temperate North America, and it winters in the southeastern United States.

      The Eurasian woodcock (Scolopax rusticola) breeds in the temperate Old World from Great Britain to Japan; occasional migrants wander to the eastern United States. Its colouring differs from that of the American woodcock in that the pale underparts of the European species are barred with brown. Both sexes are approximately the same in size, about 35 cm long. In the courtship display, known as roding, the male utters croaking sounds as he flies low over the treetops, following a triangular path.

      Other woodcocks are found in India and the East Indies.

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Universalium. 2010.

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