wire


wire
wirable, adj.wirelike, adj.
/wuyeur/, n., adj., v., wired, wiring.
n.
1. a slender, stringlike piece or filament of relatively rigid or flexible metal, usually circular in section, manufactured in a great variety of diameters and metals depending on its application.
2. such pieces as a material.
3. a length of such material, consisting either of a single filament or of several filaments woven or twisted together and usually insulated with a dielectric material, used as a conductor of electricity.
4. a cross wire or a cross hair.
5. a barbed-wire fence.
6. a long wire or cable used in cable, telegraph, or telephone systems.
7. Naut. a wire rope.
8. Informal.
a. a telegram.
b. the telegraphic system: to send a message by wire.
9. wires, a system of wires by which puppets are moved.
10. a metallic string of a musical instrument.
11. Underworld Slang. the member of a pickpocket team who picks the victim's pocket. Cf. stall2 (def. 5).
12. Horse Racing. a wire stretched across and above the track at the finish line, under which the horses pass.
13. Ornith. one of the extremely long, slender, wirelike filaments or shafts of the plumage of various birds.
14. a metal device for snaring rabbits and other small game.
15. Papermaking. the woven wire mesh over which the wet pulp is spread in a papermaking machine.
16. down to the wire, to the very last moment or the very end, as in a race or competition: The candidates campaigned down to the wire.
17. pull wires, Informal. to use one's position or influence to obtain a desired result: to pull wires to get someone a job.
18. the wire, the telephone: There's someone on the wire for you.
19. under the wire, just within the limit or deadline; scarcely; barely: to get an application in under the wire.
adj.
20. made of wire; consisting of or constructed with wires.
21. resembling wire; wirelike.
v.t.
22. to furnish with wires.
23. to install an electric system of wiring in, as for lighting.
24. to fasten or bind with wire: He wired the halves together.
25. to put on a wire, as beads.
26. to send by telegraph, as a message: Please wire the money at once.
27. to send a telegraphic message to: She wired him to come at once.
28. to snare by means of a wire.
29. to equip with a hidden electronic device, as an eavesdropping device or an explosive.
30. to connect (a receiver, area, or building) to a television cable and other equipment so that cable television programs may be received.
31. Informal. to be closely connected or involved with: a law firm wired into political circles.
32. Informal. to prepare, equip, fix, or arrange to suit needs or goals: The sales force was wired for an all-out effort.
33. Croquet. to block (a ball) by placing it behind the wire of an arch.
v.i.
34. to send a telegraphic message; telegraph: Don't write; wire.
[bef. 900; ME wir(e) (n.), OE wir; c. LG wir, ON vira- wire, OHG wiara fine goldwork]

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      thread or slender rod, usually very flexible and circular in cross section, made from various metals and alloys, including iron, steel, brass, bronze, copper, aluminum, zinc, gold, silver, and platinum. The processes used are all fundamentally the same.

      The first known writing relating to wire and its manufacture appears in the Bible (Exodus 39:3): “And gold leaf was hammered out and cut into threads . . . .” Round wire was probably made by cutting plates into narrow strips, which were then hammered and filed round. These wires were very short, and it was necessary to braze or hammer several pieces end to end to make substantial lengths.

      For several centuries wire was drawn through metal dies by hand, in short lengths. The section to be drawn was hammered to a point so that it could be pushed through the hole in the die. The wiredrawer grasped it with his hands or with tongs and pulled it through the die, the amount of reduction being limited by the strength of the wiredrawer. Various means were used to augment his strength, such as seating him in a hanging chair so that by bracing his legs against the die-holding structure he could pull with his arms and push with his legs. Larger wire had to be made by hammering or rolling or both.

      In the 19th century requirements for large tonnages and great lengths of steel and copper wire became acute, especially after the invention of wire rope, the development of the telegraph in the 1840s, and the invention of the telephone and barbed wire later in the century. These demands were met by the Bessemer and the open-hearth steelmaking processes and new machinery and methods of rolling rods.

      Wire nowadays is drawn from a hot-rolled section of steel called a rod. (Rods of some of the softer metals may be formed by extrusion or casting instead of rolling.) The rods are cleaned of scale (oxides that form on the surface) by immersion in dilute sulfuric acid. Other acids or a molten salt bath, such as of sodium hydride, may be used, as may mechanical scalers, depending on the material. Metallic grit blasting is sometimes used to clean spring wire. After acid cleaning, the metal is washed and immersed in a coating solution, such as a lime emulsion, borax, or phosphate, to neutralize any remaining acid and act as a lubricant in subsequent wire-drawing operations.

 The wire-drawing process consists of pointing the rod, threading the pointed end through the die, and attaching the end to a drawing block as shown in the figure—>. The block, revolved by an electric motor, pulls the lubricated rod through the die, reducing it in diameter and increasing its length. For smaller sizes of wire, the reduction cannot be performed in a single draft, and a multiple-block machine is used, consisting of a number of single-block machines built together in one unit.
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Wire — (w[imac]r), n. [OE. wir, AS. wir; akin to Icel. v[=i]rr, Dan. vire, LG. wir, wire; cf. OHG. wiara fine gold; perhaps akin to E. withy. [root]141.] [1913 Webster] 1. A thread or slender rod of metal; a metallic substance formed to an even thread… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Wire — Колин Ньюман, 2008 Основная информация …   Википедия

  • wire — [wīr] n. [ME < OE wir, akin to LowG wīr < IE * weir < base * wei , to bend, turn > WITHE, Gr iris, rainbow, L vitis, vine] 1. metal that has been drawn into a very long, thin thread or rod, usually circular in cross section 2. a… …   English World dictionary

  • Wire — Wire, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Wired}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Wiring}.] 1. To bind with wire; to attach with wires; to apply wire to; as, to wire corks in bottling liquors. [1913 Webster] 2. To put upon a wire; as, to wire beads. [1913 Webster] 3. To snare …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wire — [waɪə ǁ waɪr] verb [transitive] 1. to send money electronically from one bank to another: • Prosecutors said Burks moved $45,000 to his girlfriend and wired $13,300 to a bank account in Florida. 2. also wire something up to connect something to a …   Financial and business terms

  • WIRE — (engl. „Draht“, „Leitung“) steht für: Wire (Messe), eine internationale Draht und Kabel Fachmesse in Düsseldorf Wire (Band), eine (Post)Punk und Rockband aus London (ab 1976) The Wire, eine US amerikanische Fernsehserie von David Simon WIRE… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Wire — (engl. „Draht“, „Leitung“) steht für: Wire (Messe), eine internationale Draht und Kabel Fachmesse in Düsseldorf Wire (Band), eine (Post)Punk und Rockband aus London (ab 1976) The Wire, eine US amerikanische Fernsehserie von David Simon The Wire… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Wire fu — is an element of Hong Kong action cinema, exemplified by the work of Tsui Hark, Yuen Woo ping, and Jet Li, that has been appropriated by Hollywood. [cite book|pages=125|title=Contemporary World Cinema: Europe, the Middle East, East Asia and South …   Wikipedia

  • wire — ► NOUN 1) metal drawn out into a thin flexible thread or rod. 2) a length or quantity of wire used for fencing, to carry an electric current, etc. 3) a concealed electronic listening device. 4) informal a telegram. ► VERB 1) install electric… …   English terms dictionary

  • wire-fu — (wire foo) n. A cinematic technique in which actors perform kung fu moves while attached to wires and pulleys that make them appear to fly, run up walls, and so on. Example Citation: Cinematographer Peter Pau and fight choreographer Yuen Woo Ping …   New words

  • Wire — Wire, v. i. 1. To pass like a wire; to flow in a wirelike form, or in a tenuous stream. [R.] P. Fletcher. [1913 Webster] 2. To send a telegraphic message. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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