Weaver


Weaver
/wee"veuhr/, n.
1. James Baird, 1833-1912, U.S. politician: congressman 1879-81, 1885-89.
2. Robert Clifton, 1907-97, U.S. economist and government official: first Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, 1966-68.

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(as used in expressions)
Weaver James Baird
Weaver John
Weaver Warren

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bird
also called  Weaverbird,  
 any of a number of small finchlike birds of the Old World, or any of several related birds that are noted for their nest-building techniques using grass stems and other plant fibres. They are particularly well-known for their roofed nests, which in some African species form complex, hanging woven chambers. Many species of weavers are highly gregarious.

      In the true weaver family, Ploceidae (order Passeriformes), are the 57 species of the genus Ploceus, which are often divided under group names, such as masked weavers and golden weavers. All are small insectivores that breed colonially; most inhabit hot, dry country. The breeding male ploceine typically has bright yellow markings, is polygynous, and makes a nest that resembles an upside-down flask, with a bottom entrance, which may be a sort of tube. He attracts females by hanging upside down from the nest while calling and fluttering his wings. A familiar ploceine species in Africa is the village weaver (P., formerly Textor, cucullatus). The baya weaver (P. philippinus) is abundant from Pakistan to Sumatra.

      The giant communal nest of the sociable weavers (Philetairus socius (social weaver)) of southwestern Africa often reaches a height of 10 feet (3 m); the nest is usually situated in a large acacia tree and may contain more than 100 separate nest chambers, with openings at the nest's bottom. Cassin's weaver (Malimbus cassini) of the lowland rain forests of central Africa builds a hanging nest of long palm-leaf strips that has a wide entrance extending down more than two feet. The red-billed weaver ( quelea quelea) of the African savannas can sometimes become an agricultural pest; it has been reported nesting in colonies covering several square miles of trees and harbouring millions of birds. Bishop birds (Euplectes) weave nests with a side entrance, generally in wet grassy areas. (See bishop.) Whydahs (whydah) (Vidua) are social parasites that lay their eggs in the nests of other species of weavers, which then raise the whydahs' young.

      Other birds of the family Ploceidae, subfamily Passerinae, are called social weaver (q.v.). Birds called the buffalo weaver (q.v.) comprise another ploceid subfamily, Bubalornithinae. For the hooded weaver, an estrildid, see mannikin.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Weaver — commonly refers to a person that weaves fabric from thread or yarn. It may also refer to:Activities* Weaver (occupation), a person who weaves fabricAnimals* Ploceidae, the weaver bird family * Crevice weaver spider family * Orb weaver spider… …   Wikipedia

  • Weaver — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Andrew J. Weaver (* 1961), kanadischer Klimaforscher Archibald J. Weaver (1843–1887), US amerikanischer Politiker Arthur Weaver (1873–1945), US amerikanischer Politiker Blayne Weaver (* 1976), US… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Weaver — Weav er, n. 1. One who weaves, or whose occupation is to weave. Weavers of linen. P. Plowman. [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo[ o]l.) A weaver bird. [1913 Webster] 3. (Zo[ o]l.) An aquatic beetle of the genus {Gyrinus}. See {Whirling}. [1913 Webster]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Weaver — Weaver, AL U.S. city in Alabama Population (2000): 2619 Housing Units (2000): 1133 Land area (2000): 2.645372 sq. miles (6.851482 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 2.645372 sq. miles (6.851482 sq.… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Weaver, AL — U.S. city in Alabama Population (2000): 2619 Housing Units (2000): 1133 Land area (2000): 2.645372 sq. miles (6.851482 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 2.645372 sq. miles (6.851482 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • weaver — ► NOUN 1) a person who weaves fabric. 2) (also weaver bird) a finch like songbird of tropical Africa and Asia, which builds elaborately woven nests …   English terms dictionary

  • weaver — [wē′vər] n. 1. a person who weaves; esp., one whose work is weaving 2. WEAVER FINCH …   English World dictionary

  • weaver — weaver. Hейрологическая мутация, обусловливающая нарушение развития гранулярных клеток мозжечка и атаксию у мыши (аллель wv локализован на участке хромосомы 16, гомологичном участку хромосомы 21 человека, не исключено, что гомологичная мутация… …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • Weaver — (spr. ŭīwer), Fluß in der engl. Grafschaft Cheshire, fließt an Northwich (von hier ab schiffbar) vorbei und ergießt sich nach 72 km langem Lauf in das Mersey Ästuar …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Weaver —   [ wiːvə], Sigourney (Susan Alexandra), amerikanische Schauspielerin, * New York 8. 10. 1949; Darstellerin des (experimentellen) Theaters, die seit dem Durchbruch beim Film als Actionheldin in der Sciencefictionreihe »Alien« (1979 97, bisher 4… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • weaver — mid 14c. (mid 13c. as a surname), agent noun from WEAVE (Cf. weave) (v.) …   Etymology dictionary


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