weave


weave
/weev/, v., wove or (esp. for 5, 9) weaved; woven or wove; weaving; n.
v.t.
1. to interlace (threads, yarns, strips, fibrous material, etc.) so as to form a fabric or material.
2. to form by interlacing threads, yarns, strands, or strips of some material: to weave a basket; to weave cloth.
3. to form by combining various elements or details into a connected whole: to weave a tale; to weave a plan.
4. to introduce as an element or detail into a connected whole (usually fol. by in or into): She wove an old folk melody into her latest musical composition.
5. to direct or move along in a winding or zigzag course; move from side to side, esp. to avoid obstructions: to weave one's way through traffic.
v.i.
6. to form or construct something, as fabric, by interlacing threads, yarns, strips, etc.
7. to compose a connected whole by combining various elements or details.
8. to be or become formed or composed from the interlacing of materials or the combining of various elements: The yarn wove into a beautiful fabric.
9. to move or proceed in a winding course or from side to side: dancers weaving in time to the music.
n.
10. a pattern of or method for interlacing yarns.
[bef. 900; ME weven, OE wefan; c. G weben, ON vefa; see WEB]
Syn. 3. contrive, fabricate, construct, compose. 4. insert, intermix, intermingle.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Weave — (w[=e]v), v. t. [imp. {Wove} (w[=o]v); p. p. {Woven} (w[=o]v n), {Wove}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Weaving}. The regular imp. & p. p. {Weaved} (w[=e]vd), is rarely used.] [OE. weven, AS. wefan; akin to D. weven, G. weben, OHG. weban, Icel. vefa, Sw. v[… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weave — [wēv] vt. WOVE or, chiefly for vt. 6 & vi. 2, weaved, woven or wove or, chiefly for vt. 6 & vi. 2, weaved, weaving, wove [ME weven < OE wefan, akin to ON vefa, Ger weben < IE * webh (> Gr hyphē) < base * (a)we , to plait, weave] 1. a) …   English World dictionary

  • weave — Ⅰ. weave [1] ► VERB (past wove; past part. woven or wove) 1) form (fabric) by interlacing long threads passing in one direction with others at a right angle to them. 2) (usu. as noun weaving) make fabric in this way. 3) …   English terms dictionary

  • Weave — Weave, n. A particular method or pattern of weaving; as, the cassimere weave. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weave — (v.) O.E. wefan form by interlacing yarn (class V strong verb; past tense wæf, pp. wefen), from P.Gmc. *webanan (Cf. O.N. vefa, M.L.G., M.Du., Du. weven, O.H.G. weban, Ger. weben to weave ), from PIE *webh /*wobh (Cf. Skt. ubhnati he laces to …   Etymology dictionary

  • weave — weave, knit, crochet, braid, plait, tat mean to make a fabric or textile or to form an article by interlacing threads or strands of material. Weave usually implies crossing rows of threads or strands interlaced into a web, irrespective of method …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Weave — Weave, v. i. 1. To practice weaving; to work with a loom. [1913 Webster] 2. To become woven or interwoven. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weave — index incorporate (include) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • weave — verb. It is worth pointing out that there are two words involved here, although their meanings overlap in figurative applications. The one meaning ‘to form fabric by interlacing threads’ is from Old English, and the other, meaning ‘to take a… …   Modern English usage

  • weave — [v] blend, unite; contrive braid, build, careen, complect, complicate, compose, construct, create, criss cross, crochet, cue, entwine, fabricate, fold, fuse, incorporate, interfold, interlace, interlink, intermingle, intertwine, introduce, knit,… …   New thesaurus

  • weave — I n. a plain; satin; twill weave II v. 1) (C) she wove a basket for us; or: she wove us a basket 2) (d; tr.) to weave around, round (she wove the story around a specific theme) 3) (d; tr.) to weave from, out of (she wants to weave a scarf from… …   Combinatory dictionary


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