warpwise


warpwise
/wawrp"wuyz'/, adv. Textiles.
in a vertical direction; at right angles to the filling; lengthwise.
[WARP + -WISE]

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • warpwise — 1. adjective In the orientation of the warp in woven yarn. a warpwise striped pattern 2. adverb In the orientation of the warp in woven yarn. Ant: weftwise …   Wiktionary

  • warpwise — warp•wise [[t]ˈwɔrpˌwaɪz[/t]] adv. tex (in weaving) in a vertical direction; at right angles to the filling; lengthwise …   From formal English to slang

  • warpwise — /wawrp wuyz /, adv. Textiles. in a vertical direction; at right angles to the filling; lengthwise. [WARP + WISE] …   Useful english dictionary

  • Russell cord — is a corded fabric made with a cotton warp and worsted filling; two warp ends are woven together to form the cord. The cord lines run warpwise. [Fairchild s Dictionary of Textiles, 7th edition.] It can be woven using 40% cotton and 60% wool (or… …   Wikipedia

  • beat-up — /beet up /, adj. 1. Informal. dilapidated; in poor condition from use: a beat up old jalopy. n. 2. the warpwise count of tufts of pile in the warp of carpets. [1935 40; adj., n. use of v. phrase beat up] * * * …   Universalium

  • organzine — /awr geuhn zeen /, n. silk that has been additionally twisted in opposite directions, used warpwise in weaving silk fabrics. Cf. TRAM. [1690 1700; < F organsin < It organizino] * * * …   Universalium

  • oxford — /oks feuhrd/, n. 1. Also called Oxford shoe, Oxford tie. a low shoe laced over the instep. 2. Also called oxford cloth. a cotton or synthetic fabric, in plain, twill, or basket weave, constructed on a pattern of two fine yarns woven as one… …   Universalium

  • weftwise — 1. adjective In the orientation of the weft in woven yarn. a weftwise striped pattern 2. adverb In the orientation of the weft in woven yarn. Ant: warpwise …   Wiktionary

  • organzine — or•gan•zine [[t]ˈɔr gənˌzin[/t]] n. tex silk twisted in opposite directions and used warpwise in weaving silk fabrics • Etymology: 1690–1700; < F …   From formal English to slang


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