varnish


varnish
varnisher, n.varnishy, adj.
/vahr"nish/, n.
1. a preparation consisting of resinous matter, as copal or lac, dissolved in an oil (oil varnish) or in alcohol (spirit varnish) or other volatile liquid. When applied to the surface of wood, metal, etc., it dries and leaves a hard, more or less glossy, usually transparent coating.
2. the sap of certain trees, used for the same purpose (natural varnish).
3. any of various other preparations similarly used, as one having India rubber, pyroxylin, or asphalt as its chief constituent.
4. a coating or surface of varnish.
5. something resembling or suggesting a coat of varnish; gloss.
6. superficial polish or external show, esp. to conceal some defect or inadequacy: The play has a varnish of witty dialogue.
7. Brit. nail polish.
v.t.
8. to apply varnish to; coat or cover with varnish.
9. to give a glossy appearance to.
10. to give an improved appearance to; adorn.
11. to give a superficially pleasing appearance to, esp. in order to deceive: to varnish the truth.
[1300-50; ME varnisch < MF vernis, verniz < ML vernicium sandarac < MGk berníke, syncopated var. of Gk Bereníke, city in Cyrenaica]
Syn. 11. gild, disguise.

* * *

      liquid coating material containing a resin that dries to a hard transparent film. Most varnishes are a blend of resin, drying oil, drier, and volatile solvent. When varnish dries, its solvent portion evaporates, and the remaining constituents oxidize or polymerize to form a durable transparent film. Varnishes provide protective coatings for wooden surfaces, paintings, and various decorative objects. Varnish protects and enhances the appearance of wooden floors, interior wood paneling and trim, and furniture.

      The early varnishes were solutions of natural resins that are the secretions of plants. Among these natural resins are dammar, copal, and rosin (qq.v.). The natural varnishes are produced by heating the resins, adding natural oils such as linseed oil, cooking the mixture to the desired viscosity, and then diluting it with turpentine. The resultant coating took three to four days to harden, had a yellow tint, and eventually developed cracks as it aged.

      Natural varnishes have largely been replaced by varnishes containing synthetic resins, chief among which are the alkyd, polyurethane, phenolic, vinyl, and epoxy resins. The first synthetic resins used in varnishes, developed by the chemist Leo Baekeland (Baekeland, Leo Hendrik), were phenolic resins similar to Bakelite. Improved through the 1930s and '40s, phenolics were displaced in many uses by alkyds, which eventually became the single most important resin class in the coatings industry, though phenolics continue to be used in marine and floor varnishes. Alkyds are made with an alcohol such as glycerol, a dibasic acid, such as maleic or phthalic acid, and an oil, such as castor, coconut, linseed, or soybean, or a fatty acid. Unlike natural resins, synthetic resins can be manufactured in large quantities and can be chemically tailored with great precision for particular uses. For example, the molecular structure of alkyd resins can be manipulated to vary their viscosity, their hardness, their solubility in water or other substances, and their capacity to mix successfully with various pigments.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Varnish — is a transparent, hard, protective finish or film primarily used in wood finishing but also for other materials. Varnish is traditionally a combination of a drying oil, a resin, and a thinner or solvent. Varnish finishes are usually glossy but… …   Wikipedia

  • Varnish — Aktuelle Version 3.0.1 (30. August 2011) Betriebssystem Unix Programmier­sprache C Kategorie Proxy Lizenz …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Varnish — Var nish, n. [OE. vernish, F. vernis, LL. vernicium; akin to F. vernir to varnish, fr. (assumed) LL. vitrinire to glaze, from LL. vitrinus glassy, fr. L. vitrum glass. See {Vitreous}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A viscid liquid, consisting of a solution… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Varnish — Var nish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Varnished}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Varnishing}.] [Cf. F. vernir, vernisser. See {Varnish}, n.] [1913 Webster] 1. To lay varnish on; to cover with a liquid which produces, when dry, a hard, glossy surface; as, to varnish a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • varnish — [vär′nish] n. [ME vernisch < OFr verniz < ML veronix, veronice, a resin < Gr Berenikē (now Benghazi), ancient city in Cyrenaica] 1. a) a preparation made of resinous substances dissolved in oil (oil varnish) or in alcohol, turpentine,… …   English World dictionary

  • varnish — ► NOUN ▪ a substance consisting of resin dissolved in a liquid, applied to wood or another surface to give a hard, clear, shiny surface when dry. ► VERB ▪ apply varnish to. ORIGIN Old French vernis, from Latin veronix fragrant resin …   English terms dictionary

  • varnish — index embellish, invent (falsify), mislead, slant Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • varnish — [v] add a layer to; embellish adorn, coat, cover, decorate, enamel, finish, gild, glaze, gloss, japan, lacquer, luster, paint, polish, shellac, surface, veneer, wash, wax; concepts 172,177 Ant. strip …   New thesaurus

  • varnish — [[t]vɑ͟ː(r)nɪʃ[/t]] varnishes, varnishing, varnished 1) N MASS Varnish is an oily liquid which is painted onto wood or other material to give it a hard, clear, shiny surface. The varnish comes in six natural wood shades. 2) N SING The varnish on… …   English dictionary

  • varnish — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun ADJECTIVE ▪ clear, transparent ▪ gloss, glossy ▪ discoloured/discolored ▪ The painting was obscured by discoloured/discolored varnish and a heavy layer of grime …   Collocations dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.