umbilical cord


umbilical cord
1. Anat. a cord or funicle connecting the embryo or fetus with the placenta of the mother and transporting nourishment from the mother and wastes from the fetus.
2. any electrical, fuel, or other cable or connection for servicing, operating, or testing equipment, as in a rocket or missile, that is disconnected from the equipment at completion.
3. Aerospace Slang. a strong lifeline by which an astronaut on a spacewalk is connected to the vehicle and supplied with air, a communication system, etc.
[1745-55; 1965-70 for def. 2]

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Latin  Funiculus Umbilicalis,  

      narrow cord of tissue that connects a developing embryo, or fetus, with the placenta (the extra-embryonic tissues responsible for providing nourishment and other life-sustaining functions). In the human fetus, the umbilical cord arises at the belly and by the time of birth is about 2 feet (60 cm) long and 0.5 inch (1.3 cm) in diameter. It contains two umbilical arteries and one umbilical vein, through which the fetal heart pumps blood to and from the placenta, in which exchange of nutrient and waste materials with the circulatory system of the mother takes place. The umbilical vein carries blood oxygenated in the maternal body from the placenta to the fetus, while the umbilical arteries carry deoxygenated blood and fetal wastes from the fetus to the placenta, where they are treated in the maternal body. After birth, the umbilical cord is clamped or tied and is then cut. The stump of the cord that remains attached to the baby withers and falls off after a few days, leaving the circular depression in the abdomen known as the navel.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Umbilical cord — of a three minute old child. A medical clamp has been applied. Latin funiculus umbilicalis Code …   Wikipedia

  • Umbilical cord — Umbilical Um*bil ic*al, a. [Cf. F. ombilical. See {Umbilic}, n.] 1. (Anat.) Of or pertaining to an umbilicus, or umbilical cord; umbilic. [1913 Webster] 2. Pertaining to the center; central. [R.] De Foe. [1913 Webster] {Umbilical cord}. (a) (Anat …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • umbilical cord — n. 1. a tough, cordlike structure connecting the navel of a fetus to the placenta and serving to supply nourishment to, and remove waste from, the fetus ☆ 2. UMBILICAL (n. ) …   English World dictionary

  • umbilical cord — ► NOUN ▪ a flexible cord like structure containing blood vessels, attaching a fetus to the placenta during gestation …   English terms dictionary

  • Umbilical cord — The cord that connects the developing fetus with the placenta. Within this cord run the two umbilical arteries and the umbilical vein. At birth, the umbilical cord is clamped and cut. Its residual tip forms the umbilicus (naval). * * * umbilical… …   Medical dictionary

  • umbilical cord — [[t]ʌmbɪ̱lɪk(ə)l kɔ͟ː(r)d[/t]] umbilical cords 1) N COUNT: usu sing The umbilical cord is the tube that connects an unborn baby to its mother, through which it receives oxygen and food. 2) PHRASE: V and N inflect If you say that one person,… …   English dictionary

  • umbilical cord — UK [ʌmˈbɪlɪk(ə)l ˌkɔː(r)d] / US [ʌmˌbɪlɪk(ə)l ˈkɔrd] noun [countable] Word forms umbilical cord : singular umbilical cord plural umbilical cords medical a long tube that connects a baby to its mother before it is born and through which it… …   English dictionary

  • umbilical cord — n. 1) to tie (off) an umbilical cord 2) to cut the umbilical cord (also fig.) * * * to tie (off) anumbilical cord to cut the umbilical cord (also fig.) …   Combinatory dictionary

  • umbilical cord — um|bil|i|cal cord [ʌmˈbılıkəl ˌko:d US ˌko:rd] n 1.) a long narrow tube of flesh that joins an unborn baby to its mother 2.) a strong feeling of belonging to or a strong feeling of relationship with a particular place, person, organization etc ▪… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • umbilical cord — noun VERB + UMBILICAL CORD ▪ clamp, cut, tie UMBILICAL CORD + VERB ▪ be twisted around sb s neck, be wound around sb s neck …   Collocations dictionary


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