turnip


turnip
turniplike, adj.
/terr"nip/, n.
1. the thick, fleshy, edible root of either of two plants of the mustard family, the white-fleshed Brassica rapa rapifera or the yellow-fleshed rutabaga.
2. the plant itself.
3. the root of this plant used as a vegetable.
[1525-35; earlier turnep(e), equiv. to TURN (with reference to its neatly rounded shape) + nepe NEEP]

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Hardy biennial plant in the mustard family, cultivated for its fleshy roots and tender leaves.

There are two species, the turnip proper (Brassica rapa) and the Swedish turnip, or rutabaga. The true turnip probably originated in middle and eastern Asia and spread by cultivation throughout the temperate zone. Both species are cool-season crops. Turnips develop rapidly enough to have an early-spring or late-summer seeding produce a crop before, respectively, extremes of summer or late-fall weather occur.

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plant
 hardy biennial plant cultivated for its fleshy roots and tender growing tops. There are two species, belonging to the family Brassicaceae: the turnip proper, of the Rapifera Group in Brassica rapa; and the Swedish turnip, or rutabaga, of the Napobrassica Group in Brassica napus. The true turnip probably originated in middle and eastern Asia and by cultivation has spread throughout the temperate zone.

      The turnip “root” is formed by the thickening of the primary root of the seedling together with the base of the young stem immediately above it. The stem remains short during the first year; the leaves, forming a rosettelike bunch at the top of the root, are grass-green and bear rough hairs. In the second season the bud in the centre of the rosette forms a strong, erect, branched stem bearing somewhat glaucous smooth leaves. Stem and branches end in clusters of small, bright yellow flowers, which are succeeded by smooth, elongated, short-beaked seed pods.

      The rutabaga differs from the turnip in several ways: its first foliage leaves are glaucous, rather than grass-green, in colour, and the later leaves are smooth and glaucous; the root bears a distinct neck with well-marked leaf scars; the flesh is firmer and more nutritious; and the roots keep much better during winter. The white-fleshed varieties of rutabaga have a rough, green skin and are of irregular form; the flowers have a bright canary colour. Yellow-fleshed rutabagas have a smooth skin of a green, purple, or bronze colour; flowers are buff yellow or pale orange.

      Both the turnip and rutabaga are cool-season crops. The rutabaga grows less rapidly, requiring a longer season. In the lower latitudes turnips are sown either in early spring or in late summer, developing rapidly enough to produce a crop before extremes of summer or late fall weather occur. Rutabagas, however, are sown only as a main or late crop and are more hardy to cold. Rutabagas are extensively cultivated, often as a cattle fodder crop, in Canada, Great Britain, and northern Europe and to a lesser extent in the United States.

      Young turnip roots are eaten raw in salads or pickled, and the young leaves may be cooked and served. The roots are also cooked and served whole or mashed and are used in stews.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Turnip — Tur nip, n. [OE. turnep; probably fr. turn, or F. tour a turn, turning lathe + OE. nepe a turnip, AS. n[=ae]pe, L. napus. Cf. {Turn},v. t., {Navew}.] (Bot.) The edible, fleshy, roundish, or somewhat conical, root of a cruciferous plant ({Brassica …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • turnip — 1530s, turnepe, probably from TURN (Cf. turn) (from its shape, as though turned on a lathe) + M.E. nepe turnip, from O.E. næp, from L. napus turnip. The modern form of the word emerged late 18c …   Etymology dictionary

  • turnip — [tʉr′nip] n. [earlier turnep, prob. < TURN or Fr tour, in the sense of “turned, round” + ME nepe < OE næp, turnip < L napus] 1. a) a biennial plant (Brassica rapa) of the crucifer family, with edible, hairy leaves and a roundish, light… …   English World dictionary

  • Turnip — (engl., spr. Törrnip, Turnips), die Runkel od. Futterrübe, s.u. Kohlrübe …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Turnip — (Tör–), engl., die Runkelrübe …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • turnip — ► NOUN ▪ a round root with white or cream flesh which is eaten as a vegetable. ORIGIN from a first element of unknown origin + NEEP(Cf. ↑N) …   English terms dictionary

  • Turnip — taxobox name = Turnip image caption = Small turnip root regnum = Plantae unranked divisio = Angiosperms unranked classis = Eudicots unranked ordo = Rosids ordo = Brassicales familia = Brassicaceae genus = Brassica species = B. rapa subspecies = B …   Wikipedia

  • turnip — (Roget s IV) n. Syn. domestic turnip, rutabaga, Swedish turnip, turnip cabbage, kohlrabi, Teltow turnip, wild turnip, Indian turnip; see also vegetable …   English dictionary for students

  • turnip — [16] Etymologically, a turnip may be a ‘turned neep’ – that is, a neep, or turnip, that has been ‘turned’ on a lathe, so as to be round (the turnip is a roughly spherical vegetable). Its second syllable, nip, goes back ultimately to Latin nāpus… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • turnip — [16] Etymologically, a turnip may be a ‘turned neep’ – that is, a neep, or turnip, that has been ‘turned’ on a lathe, so as to be round (the turnip is a roughly spherical vegetable). Its second syllable, nip, goes back ultimately to Latin nāpus… …   Word origins