tulip


tulip
tuliplike, adj.
/tooh"lip, tyooh"-/, n.
1. any of various plants belonging to the genus Tulipa, of the lily family, cultivated in many varieties, and having lance-shaped leaves and large, showy, usually erect, cup-shaped or bell-shaped flowers in a variety of colors.
2. a flower or bulb of such a plant.
[1570-80; earlier tulipa < NL, appar. back formation from It tulipano (taken as adj.) < Turk tülbent turban (from a fancied likeness); see TURBAN]

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Any of almost 4,000 varieties of about 100 species of cultivated bulbous herbaceous plants making up the genus Tulipa in the lily family, native to Eurasia.

Among the most popular of all garden flowers, the tulip produces two or three thick, bluish-green leaves clustered at the base of the plant. The usually solitary inverted bell-shaped flowers have three petals and three sepals. Colors range from white through yellows and reds to brown and deep purple to almost black. Streaked blossoms get their streaks from a harmless virus infection that causes the color to disappear in patterns, letting white or yellow show through.

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plant
 (genus Tulipa), any of a group of cultivated bulbous herbs in the family Liliaceae. The genus Tulipa consists of about 100 species that are native to Eurasia from Austria and Italy eastward to Japan, with two-thirds of them native to the eastern Mediterranean and the southeastern parts of the Soviet Union. Tulips are among the most popular of all garden flowers.

      Tulips were introduced to the Western world by the Viennese ambassador to Turkey, Augier Ghislain de Busbecq, who wrote of seeing the plants in Edirne, Tur., in 1551 and who later sent some seeds to Austria. The arrival at Antwerp in 1562 of a cargo of tulip bulbs from Constantinople (now Istanbul) marked the beginning of the tulip horticultural industry in Europe. A speculative frenzy over tulips in the Netherlands in 1633–37 is now known as the Tulip Mania (q.v.).

      The tulip produces two or three thick, bluish green leaves that are clustered at the base of the plant. The usually solitary bell-shaped flowers have three petals and three sepals. There are six free stamens, and the three-lobed ovary is terminated by a sessile three-lobed stigma. The fruit is a capsule with many seeds. Many garden tulips can be propagated only by their scaly bulbs.

      Tulip flowers occur in a wide range of colours except true blue—from purest white through all shades of yellow and red to brown and deepest purple to almost black. Almost 4,000 horticultural varieties have been developed. There are several different classification schemes based on the plants' time of bloom, flower shape, and plant size. Among the tulips that appear earliest in spring are single-flowered and double-flowered early types. Tulip types that bloom in mid-season include Mendels and Darwins. Late-blooming tulips are the largest class, with the widest range of growth habits and colours. Among them are Darwins, breeders, cottage, lily-flowered, double-late, and parrot types.

      Generally, solid-coloured tulips are spoken of as “self-coloured,” while streaked blossoms are called “broken.” The phenomenon of colour streaks in tulips is due to a harmless virus infection that causes the self colour to disappear in certain zonal patterns, leaving the flower's white or yellow underlying colour to show through in irregular streaks.

      Tulips flourish in any good soil but do best in well-drained loam. The bulbs are usually planted in the autumn at a depth of four to eight inches below the surface in a soil enriched with compost. Though they will continue to flower annually for a few years, they tend eventually to degenerate. A common commercial practice is to lift the bulbs after the flowers have ceased blooming and the foliage has turned yellow; the bulbs are then stored in a cool, dry place until replanting time in the autumn. In general, tulips are remarkably free from attack by garden pests.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • tulip — (n.) 1570s, via Du. or Ger. tulpe, Fr. tulipe a tulip, all ultimately from Turk. tülbent turban, also gauze, muslin, from Pers. dulband turban; so called from the fancied resemblance of the flower to a turban. Introduced from Turkey to Europe,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Tulip — Tu lip, n. [F. tulipe, OF. also tulipan, It. tulipano, tulipa, from Turk. tulbend, dulbend, literally, a turban, Per. dulband; so called from the resemblance of the form of this flower to a turban. See {Turban}.] (Bot.) Any plant of the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tulip — ► NOUN ▪ a spring flowering plant with boldly coloured cup shaped flowers. ORIGIN French tulipe, from Persian, turban (from the shape of the flower) …   English terms dictionary

  • tulip — [to͞o′lip, tyo͞o′lip] n. [Fr tulipe (earlier tulipan) < Turk tülbend, TURBAN: from the flower s resemblance to a turban] 1. any of various bulb plants (genus Tulipa) of the lily family, mostly spring blooming, with long, broad, pointed leaves… …   English World dictionary

  • Tulip — For other uses, see Tulip (disambiguation). Tulip Cultivated tulip – Floriade 2005, Canberra Scientific classification Kingdom …   Wikipedia

  • tulip — tu·lip (to͞o’lĭp, tyo͞o’ ) n. 1) Any of several bulbous plants of the genus Tulipa of the lily family, native chiefly to Asia and widely cultivated for their showy, variously colored, cup shaped flowers. 2) The flower of any of these plants. ╂… …   Word Histories

  • tulip — n. 1 any bulbous spring flowering plant of the genus Tulipa, esp. one of the many cultivated forms with showy cup shaped flowers of various colours and markings. 2 a flower of this plant. Phrases and idioms: tulip root a disease of oats etc.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Tulip — This rare and unusual surname is of Anglo Saxon origin, and is a locational name from some minor, unrecorded or now lost place, believed to have been situated in Northumberland, because of the large number of early recordings in that region. An… …   Surnames reference

  • tulip — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ dwarf ▪ early, late TULIP + NOUN ▪ bulb ▪ fields Tulip is used before these nouns: ↑ …   Collocations dictionary

  • tulip — UK [ˈtjuːlɪp] / US [ˈtulɪp] noun [countable] Word forms tulip : singular tulip plural tulips a colourful flower shaped like a cup that grows on a long stem in spring …   English dictionary


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