truss


truss
trusser, n.
/trus/, v.t.
1. to tie, bind, or fasten.
2. to make fast with skewers, thread, or the like, as the wings or legs of a fowl in preparation for cooking.
3. to furnish or support with a truss or trusses.
4. to tie or secure (the body) closely or tightly; bind (often fol. by up).
5. Falconry. (of a hawk, falcon, etc.) to grasp (prey) firmly.
n.
6. Civ. Engin., Building Trades.
a. any of various structural frames based on the geometric rigidity of the triangle and composed of straight members subject only to longitudinal compression, tension, or both: functions as a beam or cantilever to support bridges, roofs, etc. Cf. complete (def. 8), incomplete (def. 3), redundant (def. 5c).
b. any of various structural frames constructed on principles other than the geometric rigidity of the triangle or deriving stability from other factors, as the rigidity of joints, the abutment of masonry, or the stiffness of beams.
7. Med. an apparatus consisting of a pad usually supported by a belt for maintaining a hernia in a reduced state.
8. Hort. a compact terminal cluster or head of flowers growing upon one stalk.
9. Naut. a device for supporting a standing yard, having a pivot permitting the yard to swing horizontally when braced.
10. a collection of things tied together or packed in a receptacle; bundle; pack.
11. Chiefly Brit. a bundle of hay or straw, esp. one containing about 56 lb. (25.4 kg) of old hay, 60 lb. (27.2 kg) of new hay, or 36 lb. (16.3 kg) of straw.
[1175-1225; (v.) ME trussen < OF tr(o)usser, var. of torser, prob. < VL *torsare, deriv. of *torsus, for L tortus ptp. of torquere to twist, wind, wrap; (n.) ME: bundle < OF trousse, torse, deriv. of torser]

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In building construction, a structural frame usually fabricated from pieces of metal or timber to form a series of triangles lying in a single plane.

The linear members are subject only to compression or tension. The horizontal pieces forming the top and bottom of the truss are called the chords, and the sloping and vertical pieces connecting the chords are collectively called the web. Unlike a vault, the truss exerts no thrust but only downward pressure; supporting walls require no buttressing or extra thickening. Trusses have been used extensively in roofing and bridges. Wood trusses were probably first used in primitive dwellings с 2500 BC. Wood was replaced by iron, which in turn was succeeded by steel.

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      in engineering, a structural member usually fabricated from straight pieces of metal or timber to form a series of triangles lying in a single plane. (A triangle cannot be distorted by stress.)

      A truss gives a stable form capable of supporting considerable external load over a large span with the component parts stressed primarily in axial tension or compression. The individual pieces intersect at truss joints, or panel points. The connected pieces forming the top and bottom of the truss are referred to respectively as the top and bottom chords. The sloping and vertical pieces connecting the chords are collectively referred to as the web of the truss.

      Trusses were probably first used in primitive lake dwellings during the early Bronze Age, about 2500 BC. The first trusses were built of timber. The Greeks used trusses extensively in roofing, and trusses were used for various construction purposes in the European Middle Ages. Andrea Palladio's I quattro libri dell'architettura (1570; Four Books on Architecture) contained plans for timber trusses. A major impetus to truss design came in the development of covered bridges in the United States in the early 19th century. Cast iron and wrought iron were succeeded by steel for railroad truss bridges. The two systems most commonly used are the Pratt and the Warren; in the former, the sloping web members are parallel to each other, while, in the latter, they alternate in direction of slope. Trusses are also used in many kinds of machinery, such as cranes and lifts, and in aircraft wings and fuselages.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Truss — Truss, n. [OE. trusse, F. trousse, OF. also tourse; perhaps fr. L. tryrsus stalk, stem. Cf. {Thyrsus}, {Torso}, {Trousers}, {Trousseau}.] 1. A bundle; a package; as, a truss of grass. Fabyan. [1913 Webster] Bearing a truss of trifles at his back …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Truss — Truss, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Trussed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Trussing}.] [F. trousser. See {Truss}, n.] 1. To bind or pack close; to tie up tightly; to make into a truss. Shak. [1913 Webster] It [his hood] was trussed up in his wallet. Chaucer. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Truss — steht für: Trage und Aufbaukonstruktionen in der Veranstaltungstechnik, siehe Traverse (Veranstaltungstechnik) Truss ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Lynne Truss (* 1955), englische Autorin und Journalistin Warren Truss (* 1948),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • truss — truss; truss·er; un·truss; …   English syllables

  • truss´er — truss «truhs», verb, noun. –v.t. 1. to tie; fasten; bind: »to truss up a bundle of plants. We trussed the burglar up and called the police. 2. to fasten the wings or legs of (a fowl or small animal) with skewers or twine in preparation for… …   Useful english dictionary

  • truss — ► NOUN 1) a framework of rafters, posts, and struts which supports a roof, bridge, or other structure. 2) a padded belt worn against the skin to support a hernia. 3) a large projection of stone or timber, typically one supporting a cornice. 4)… …   English terms dictionary

  • truss — [trus] vt. [ME trussen < OFr trousser, to bundle together, pack < ? VL * torsare < * torsus, for L tortus, pp. of torquere, to twist: see TORT] 1. to tie, bind, or bundle: often with up 2. to skewer or bind the wings and legs of (a fowl) …   English World dictionary

  • Truss — (engl., spr. tröss, »Bündel, Bund«), ein Gewicht, besonders für Stroh und Heu, 36 im Load des englischen Handelsgewichtes: für Stroh 36, trockenes Heu 56 und Heu bis 4. Sept. 60 Pounds avdp …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • truss — index bear (support) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • truss — (n.) c.1200, collection of things bound together, from O.Fr. trousse, torse, of unknown origin, perhaps from V.L. *torciare to twist. Meaning surgical appliance to support a rupture, etc. first attested 1540s. Sense of framework for supporting a… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Truss — For other uses, see Truss (disambiguation). In architecture and structural engineering, a truss is a structure comprising one or more triangular units constructed with straight members whose ends are connected at joints referred to as nodes.… …   Wikipedia


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