trading stamp


trading stamp
a stamp with a certain value given as a premium by a retailer to a customer, specified quantities of these stamps being exchangeable for various articles.
[1895-1900, Amer.]

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stamp
      printed stamps given as a premium by retailers to customers and redeemable for cash or merchandise from the trading stamp company when accumulated in specified amounts. Retailers sponsor trading stamp programs as a means of building customer loyalty. The retailer purchases the stamps from the trading stamp company at a cost based on a small percentage of total sales.

      Trading stamps appeared in the United States and Great Britain in the late 19th century. The most popular trading stamp program in the United States, S&H Green Stamps, was sponsored by Sperry & Hutchinson. The company started operations in 1896 and flourished from the 1930s through the 1960s. In 1964 the S&H Green Stamp catalog became the largest single publication distributed in the United States. Trading stamp programs were also popular in Great Britain and Japan during the 1960s.

      Although the use of printed trading stamps waned toward the end of the 20th century, the notion of rewards as a means of generating customer loyalty evolved into so-called “affinity” or “loyalty reward” programs. These programs are exemplified by airlines' frequent flier programs and hotels' frequent stay programs. At the turn of the 21st century, S&H introduced an electronic version of trading stamps called S&H Greenpoints. This and other online loyalty programs allow customers to accrue points and earn rewards through Internet transactions.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • trading stamp — {n.} One of the stamps that you get (as from a store or gas station) because you buy something there; a stamp you get with a purchase and save in special books until you have enough to take to a special store and trade for something you want. *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • trading stamp — {n.} One of the stamps that you get (as from a store or gas station) because you buy something there; a stamp you get with a purchase and save in special books until you have enough to take to a special store and trade for something you want. *… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • trading\ stamp — noun One of the stamps that you get (as from a store or gas station) because you buy something there; a stamp you get with a purchase and save in special books until you have enough to take to a special store and trade for something you want.… …   Словарь американских идиом

  • trading stamp — trad′ing stamp n. bus a stamp given as a premium to a customer, specified quantities of these stamps being exchangeable for various articles • Etymology: 1895–1900, amer …   From formal English to slang

  • trading stamp — /ˈtreɪdɪŋ stæmp/ (say trayding stamp) noun a stamp with a certain value given as a premium by a seller to a customer, specified quantities of these stamps being exchangeable for various articles when presented to the issuers of the stamps …   Australian English dictionary

  • trading stamp — noun Date: 1897 a printed stamp of value given as a premium to a retail customer to be redeemed in merchandise when accumulated in numbers …   New Collegiate Dictionary