through


through
/throoh/, prep.
1. in at one end, side, or surface and out at the other: to pass through a tunnel; We drove through Denver without stopping. Sun came through the window.
2. past; beyond: to go through a stop sign without stopping.
3. from one to the other of; between or among the individual members or parts of: to swing through the trees; This book has passed through many hands.
4. over the surface of, by way of, or within the limits or medium of: to travel through a country; to fly through the air.
5. during the whole period of; throughout: They worked through the night.
6. having reached the end of; done with: to be through one's work.
7. to and including: from 1900 through 1950.
8. by the means or instrumentality of; by the way or agency of: It was through him they found out.
9. by reason of or in consequence of: to run away through fear.
10. in at the first step of a process, treatment, or method of handling, passing through subsequent steps or stages in order, and finished, accepted, or out of the last step or stage: The body of a car passes through 147 stages on the production line. The new tax bill finally got through Congress.
adv.
11. in at one end, side, or surface and out at the other: to push a needle through; just passing through.
12. all the way; along the whole distance: This train goes through to Boston.
13. throughout: soaking wet through.
14. from the beginning to the end: to read a letter through.
15. to the end: to carry a matter through.
16. to a favorable or successful conclusion: He barely managed to pull through.
17. through and through,
a. through the whole extent of; thoroughly: cold through and through.
b. from beginning to end; in all respects: an aristocrat through and through.
adj.
18. having completed an action, process, etc.; finished: Please be still until I'm through. When will you be through with school?
19. at the end of all relations or dealings: My sister insists she's through with selfish friends.
20. passing or extending from one end, side, or surface to the other.
21. traveling or moving to a destination without changing of trains, planes, etc.: a through flight.
22. (of a road, route, way, course, etc., or of a ticket, routing order, etc.) admitting continuous or direct passage; having no interruption, obstruction, or hindrance: a through highway; through ticket.
23. (of a bridge truss) having a deck or decks within the depth of the structure. Cf. deck (def. 21).
24. of no further use or value; washed-up: Critics say he's through as a writer.
[bef. 900; ME (prep. and adv.), metathetic var. of thourgh, OE thurh, c. G durch; akin to OE therh, Goth thairh through, OHG derh perforated, OE thyrel full of holes (adj.), hole (n.). See THIRL]
Syn. 8. See by.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

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  • through — [ θru ] function word *** Through can be used in the following ways: as a preposition (followed by a noun): They were riding through a forest. as an adverb (without a following noun): There s a hole in the roof where the rain comes through. as an …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • through — [thro͞o] prep. [ME thurgh, thrugh < OE thurh, akin to Ger durch < IE base * ter , through, beyond > L trans, across, Sans tiráḥ, through] 1. in one side and out the other side of; from end to end of 2. a) in the midst of [flying through… …   English World dictionary

  • Through — Through, prep. [OE. thurgh, [thorn]urh, [thorn]uruh, [thorn]oruh, AS. [thorn]urh; akin to OS. thurh, thuru, OFries. thruch, D. door, OHG. durh, duruh, G. durch, Goth. [thorn]a[ i]rh; cf. Ir. tri, tre, W. trwy. [root]53. Cf. {Nostril}, {Thorough} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Through — Through, a. Going or extending through; going, extending, or serving from the beginning to the end; thorough; complete; as, a through line; a through ticket; a through train. Also, admitting of passage through; as, a through bridge. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Through — Through, adv. 1. From one end or side to the other; as, to pierce a thing through. [1913 Webster] 2. From beginning to end; as, to read a letter through. [1913 Webster] 3. To the end; to a conclusion; to the ultimate purpose; as, to carry a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • through — There are two important uses which are still regarded as Americanisms but are beginning to make an impression on BrE: 1. As a preposition meaning ‘up to and including’, as in Monday through Friday. British speakers are aware of this use but still …   Modern English usage

  • through — c.1300, metathesis of O.E. þurh, from W.Gmc. *thurkh (Cf. O.S. thuru, O.Fris. thruch, M.Du. dore, Du. door, O.H.G. thuruh, Ger. durch, Goth. þairh through ), from PIE root *tere through (Cf. Skt. tirah, Avestan …   Etymology dictionary

  • through — [adj1] done buttoned up*, complete, completed, concluded, ended, finis*, finished, in the bag*, over, terminated, wound up*, wrapped up*; concepts 531,548 Ant. incomplete, unfinished through [adj2] direct constant, free, nonstop, one way, opened …   New thesaurus

  • through — ► PREPOSITION & ADVERB 1) moving in one side and out of the other side of (an opening or location). 2) so as to make a hole or passage in. 3) (preposition ) expressing the position or location of something beyond (an opening or an obstacle). 4)… …   English terms dictionary

  • through — through; through·ly; through·ith·er; …   English syllables

  • through — I adjective completed, concluded, decided, done, done with, ended, finished, set at rest, settled, terminated II (By means of) adverb by means of, by the hand of, by way of, using, using the help of III (From beginning to end) adverb …   Law dictionary


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