hieroglyph


hieroglyph
hieroglyph [hī′ər ō glif΄, hī′rə glif΄]
n.

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hi·er·o·glyph (hīʹər-ə-glĭf', hīʹrə-) n.
1. A picture or symbol used in hieroglyphic writing.
2. Something that suggests a hieroglyph.

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Character in any of several systems of writing that is pictorial in nature, though not necessarily in the way it is read.

The term was originally used for the oldest system of writing Ancient Egyptian (see Egyptian language). Egyptian hieroglyphs could be read iconically (the representation of a house enclosure stood for the word pr, "house"), phonetically (the "house" sign could have the phonetic value pr), or associatively (a sign representing one thing could stand for a homophone meaning something else). Unlike contemporary cuneiform writing, phonetic hieroglyphs denoted consonants, not syllables, so there was no regular way to write vowels; by convention, Egyptologists insert the vowel e between consonants in order to pronounce Egyptian words. The standardized orthography of the Middle Kingdom (2050–1750 BC) employed about 750 hieroglyphs. In the early centuries AD, use of hieroglyphs declined
the last dated text is from AD 394
and the meaning of the signs was lost until their decipherment in the early 19th century (see J.-F. Champollion; Rosetta Stone). The term hieroglyph has been applied to similar systems of writing, notably a script used to write the ancient Anatolian language Luvian and a script used by the Maya (see Mayan hieroglyphic writing).

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      a character used in a system of pictorial writing, particularly that form used on ancient Egyptian monuments. Hieroglyphic symbols may represent the objects that they depict but usually stand for particular sounds (phonetics) or groups of sounds. Hieroglyph, meaning “sacred carving,” is a Greek translation of the Egyptian phrase “the god's words,” which was used at the time of the early Greek contacts with Egypt to distinguish the older hieroglyphs from the handwriting of the day (demotic) (demotic script). Modern usage has extended the term to other writing systems, such as Hieroglyphic Hittite, Mayan hieroglyphs, and early Cretan. There is no connection between Egyptian hieroglyphs and these other scripts, the only certain derivative from the Egyptian writing being that used for Meroitic.

      A brief treatment of hieroglyphs follows. For full treatment, see hieroglyphic writing.

      Egyptian hieroglyphic writing was composed entirely of pictures, though the object depicted cannot be identified in every instance. The earliest examples that can be read show the hieroglyphs used as actual writing, that is, with phonetic values, and not as picture writing such as that of the Eskimos or American Indians. The origins of the script are not known. It apparently arose in the late predynastic period (just before 2925 BC). There were contacts between Egypt and Mesopotamia at this time, and it has been thought that the concept of writing was borrowed from the Sumerians. This is certainly possible, but, even if this was the case, the two systems were so different in their use of signs that it is clear that they developed independently.

      Except for names and a few titles, the oldest inscriptions cannot be read. In many cases individual hieroglyphs were used that are familiar from later periods, but the meaning of the inscription as a whole is obscure. It is apparent that this writing did not represent the sounds as completely as was the case later.

      In the period of the 3rd dynasty (c. 2650–c. 2575 BC), many of the principles of hieroglyphic writing were regularized. From that time on, until the script was supplanted by an early version of Coptic (about the 3rd and 4th centuries AD), the system remained virtually unchanged. Even the number of signs used remained constant at about 700 for more than 2,000 years. With the rise of Christianity in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD came the decline and ultimate demise not only of the ancient Egyptian religion but of its hieroglyphics as well. The use, by the Egyptian Christians, of an adapted form of the Greek alphabet, caused a correspondingly widespread disuse of the native Egyptian script. The last known use of hieroglyphics is on an inscription dated AD 394.

      Hieroglyphic writing followed four basic principles. First, a hieroglyph could be used in an almost purely pictorial way. The sign of a man with his hand to his mouth might stand for the word “eat.” Similarly, the word “sun” would be represented by a large circle with a smaller circle in its centre. Second, a hieroglyph might represent or imply another word suggested by the picture. The sign for “sun” could as easily serve as the sign for “day” or as the name of the sun god Re. The sign for “eat” could also represent the more conceptual word “silent” by suggesting the covering of the mouth. Third, the signs also served as representatives of words that shared consonants in the same order. Thus the Egyptian words for “man” and “be bright,” both spelled with the same consonants, hg, could be rendered by the same hieroglyph. Fourth, the hieroglyphs stood for individual or combinations of consonants.

      It is arguable whether the ancient Greeks or Romans understood hieroglyphics. The Greeks (ancient Greek civilization) almost certainly did not, since, from their viewpoint, hieroglyphics were not phonetic signs but symbols of a more abstruse and allegorical nature. The humanist revival of the European Middle Ages, although it produced a set of Italian-designed hieroglyphics, gave no further insight into the original Egyptian ones.

      The first attempt to decipher hieroglyphics, based on the assumption that they were indeed phonetic symbols, was made by the German scholar Athanasius Kircher (Kircher, Athanasius) in the mid-1600s. Despite his initial correct hypothesis, he correctly identified only one symbol.

      The discovery of the Rosetta Stone in 1799 was to provide the key to the final unlocking of the mystery. The stone was inscribed with three different scripts: hieroglyphic, demotic, and Greek. Based on the stone's own declaration, in the Greek portion, that the text was identical in all three cases, several significant advances were made in translation. A.I. Silvestre de Sacy, a French scholar, and J.D. Akerblad, a Swedish diplomat, succeeded in identifying a number of proper names in the demotic text. Akerblad also correctly assigned phonetic values to a few of the signs. An Englishman, Thomas Young (Young, Thomas), correctly identified five of the hieroglyphics. The full deciphering of the stone was accomplished by another Frenchman, Jean-Françoise Champollion (Champollion, Jean-François). He brought to the stone a natural facility for languages (having, by age 16, become proficient in six ancient Oriental languages as well as Greek and Latin). By comparison of one sign with another, he was able to determine the phonetic values of the hieroglyphics. Later studies simply confirmed and refined Champollion's work.

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Hieroglyph — Hi er*o*glyph, Hieroglyphic Hi er*o*glyph ic, n. [Cf. F. hi[ e]roglyphe. See {Hieroglyphic}, a.] [1913 Webster] 1. A sacred character; a character used in picture writing, as of the ancient Egyptians, Mexicans, etc. Specifically, in the plural,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hieroglyph — (n.) 1590s, shortening of hieroglyphic (n.), 1590s; see HIEROGLYPHIC (Cf. hieroglyphic) …   Etymology dictionary

  • hieroglyph — ► NOUN ▪ a stylized picture of an object representing a word, syllable, or sound, as found in ancient Egyptian and certain other writing systems …   English terms dictionary

  • hieroglyph — [hī′ər ō glif΄, hī′rə glif΄] n. HIEROGLYPHIC …   English World dictionary

  • Hieroglyph — wiktionary|hieroglyphHieroglyph (Greek gr. ἱερογλύφος sacred carving ) or hieroglyphics ( = gr. τὰ ἱερογλυφικά [γράμματα] ) may refer to: *Egyptian hieroglyphs **Cursive hieroglyphs *more generally, a character of any logographic or partly… …   Wikipedia

  • hieroglyph — noun Etymology: French hiéroglyphe, from Middle French, back formation from hieroglyphique Date: 1598 1. a character used in a system of hieroglyphic writing 2. something that resembles a hieroglyph …   New Collegiate Dictionary

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  • hieroglyph — noun /ˈhaɪɹəˌɡlɪf/ an element of an ideographic (hieroglyphic) writing system …   Wiktionary

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