swift


swift
swiftly, adv.swiftness, n.
/swift/, adj., swifter, swiftest, adv., n.
adj.
1. moving or capable of moving with great speed or velocity; fleet; rapid: a swift ship.
2. coming, happening, or performed quickly or without delay: a swift decision.
3. quick or prompt to act or respond: swift to jump to conclusions.
4. Slang. quick to perceive or understand; smart; clever: You can't cheat him, he's too swift.
adv.
5. swiftly.
n.
6. any of numerous long-winged, swallowlike birds of the family Apodidae, related to the hummingbirds and noted for their rapid flight.
7. See tree swift.
8. See spiny lizard.
9. Also called swift moth, ghost moth. any of several brown or gray moths, the males of which are usually white, of the family Hepialidae, noted for rapid flight.
10. an adjustable device upon which a hank of yarn is placed in order to wind off skeins or balls.
11. the main cylinder on a machine for carding flax.
[bef. 900; ME (adj. and adv.), OE (adj.); akin to OE swifan to revolve, ON svifa to rove; see SWIVEL]
Syn. 1. speedy. See quick. 2. expeditious.

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Any of about 75 species (family Apodidae) of birds found almost worldwide.

The fastest of small birds, swifts can fly at 70 mph (110 kph). They are 4–9 in. (9–23 cm) long and have long wings, a chunky dark body, a broad head, and a short, wide, slightly curved bill. The tail may be short or long and deeply forked. Swifts capture insects, drink, bathe, and sometimes mate on the wing. The feet, incapable of perching, are used to cling to vertical surfaces. Swifts use their sticky saliva to glue the nest to a cave wall, the inside of a chimney, or a tree hollow.

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bird
 any of about 75 species of agile, fast-flying birds of the family Apodidae (sometimes Micropodidae), in the order Apodiformes, which also includes the hummingbirds. The family is divided into the subfamilies Apodinae, or soft-tailed swifts, and Chaeturinae, or spine-tailed swifts. Almost worldwide in distribution, swifts are absent only from polar regions, southern Chile and Argentina, New Zealand, and most of Australia.

      Closely resembling swallows, swifts range in length from about 9 to 23 cm (3.5 to 9 inches). They have exceptionally long wings and chunky, powerful bodies. Their compact plumage is a dull or glossy gray, brown, or black, sometimes with pale or white markings on the throat, neck, belly, or rump. The head is broad, with a short, wide, slightly curved bill. The tail, although often short, may be long and deeply forked. The feet are tiny and weak; with the aid of sharp claws they are used only to cling to vertical surfaces. A swift that lands on flat ground may be unable to regain the air. In soft-tailed forms, the hind toe is rotated forward as an aid in gripping vertical surfaces; in spine-tailed swifts, support is gained from the short needle-tipped tail feathers, and the feet are less modified.

      In feeding, swifts course tirelessly back and forth, capturing insects with their large mouths open. They also drink, bathe, and sometimes mate on the wing. They fly with relatively stiff, slow wingbeats (four to eight per second), but the scimitar-like design of the wing makes it the most efficient among birds for high-speed flight. The fastest of small birds, swifts are believed to reach 110 km (70 miles) per hour regularly; reports of speeds three times that figure are not confirmed. The only avian predators known to take swifts with regularity are some of the larger falcons.

      The nest of a swift is made of twigs, buds, moss, or feathers and is glued with its sticky saliva to the wall of a cave or the inside of a chimney, rock crack, or hollow tree. A few species attach the nest to a palm frond, an extreme example being the tropical Asian palm swift (Cypsiurus parvus), which glues its eggs to a tiny, flat feather nest on the surface of a palm leaf, which may be hanging vertically or even upside down. Swifts lay from one to six white eggs (usually two or three). Both eggs and young may be allowed to cool toward the environmental temperature in times of food scarcity, slowing development and conserving resources. The young stay in the nest or cling near it for 6 to 10 weeks, the length of time depending largely on the food supply. Upon fledging, they resemble the adults and immediately fly adeptly.

      Among the best-known swifts is the chimney swift (Chaetura pelagica), a spine-tailed, uniformly dark gray bird that breeds in eastern North America and winters in South America, nesting in such recesses as chimneys and hollow trees; about 17 other Chaetura species are known worldwide. The common swift (Apus apus), called simply “swift” in Great Britain, is a soft-tailed, black bird that breeds across Eurasia and winters in southern Africa, nesting in buildings and hollow trees; nine other Apus swifts are found throughout temperate regions of the Old World, and some Apus species inhabit South America. The white-collared swift (Streptoprocne zonaris), soft-tailed and brownish black with a narrow white collar, is found from Mexico to Argentina and on larger Caribbean islands, nesting in caves and behind waterfalls. The white-rumped swift (Apus caffer), soft-tailed and black with white markings, is resident throughout Africa south of the Sahara. The white-throated swift (Aeronautes saxatalis), soft-tailed and black with white markings, breeds in western North America and winters in southern Central America, nesting on vertical rock cliffs.

moth
also called  Ghost Moth,  
 any of approximately 500 species of insects in the order Lepidoptera that are some of the largest moths, with wingspans of more than 22.5 cm (9 inches). Most European and North American species are brown or gray with silver spots on the wings, whereas the African, New Zealand, and Australian species are brightly coloured.

      Swifts are fast, though sometimes erratic, fliers. The larvae either bore in the roots of herbaceous plants or live in turf feeding on grass roots (e.g., genus Porina).

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

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  • swift´ly — swift «swihft», adjective, adverb, noun. –adj. 1. moving very fast; able to move very fast: »a swift horse, a swift automobile. SYNONYM(S): fleet, speedy, rapid. 2. made or done at high speed; quick: »a swift pace, the swift clicking of the… …   Useful english dictionary

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  • SWIFT — (Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications) сообщество всемирных межбанковских финансовых телекоммуникаций. Создано в 1973 году с целью телекоммуникационного обслуживания банков участников сообщества на рынке платежей, а также… …   Банковская энциклопедия

  • Swift — (sw[i^]ft), a. [Compar. {Swifter} (sw[i^]ft [ e]r); superl. {Swiftest}.] [AS. swift; akin to sw[=a]pan to sweep, swipu a whip; cf. sw[=i]fan to move quickly, to revolve. See {Swoop}, v. i., and cf. {Swivel}, {Squib}.] 1. Moving a great distance… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Swift — Swift, n. 1. The current of a stream. [R.] Walton. [1913 Webster] 2. (Zo[ o]l.) Any one of numerous species of small, long winged, insectivorous birds of the family {Micropodid[ae]}. In form and habits the swifts resemble swallows, but they are… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Swift — /swift/, n. 1. Gustavus Franklin, 1839 1903, U.S. meat packer. 2. Jonathan ( Isaac Bickerstaff ), 1667 1745, English satirist and clergyman, born in Ireland. * * * Any of about 75 species (family Apodidae) of birds found almost worldwide. The… …   Universalium

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