strawberry


strawberry
/straw"ber'ee, -beuh ree/, n., pl. strawberries.
1. the fruit of any stemless plant belonging to the genus Fragaria, of the rose family, consisting of an enlarged fleshy receptacle bearing achenes on its exterior. See illus. under achene.
2. the plant itself.
[bef. 1000; ME; OE streawberige. See STRAW, BERRY]

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Fruit plant of eight main species of the genus Fragaria (rose family), the chief cultivated varieties of which are F. virginiana and F. chiloensis, native to the Americas.

The low-growing, herbaceous plant has a fibrous root system and a crown from which basal leaves arise. The leaves are compound, with three leaflets, sawtooth-edged and hairy. Small clusters of white flowers grow on slender stalks. Botanically, the strawberry fruit is not a berry or a single fruit, but is instead a greatly enlarged stem end that contains many partially embedded true fruits (achenes), popularly called seeds. The plant propagates by stolons as it ages. Strawberries are very perishable and require cool, dry storage. They are eaten fresh or prepared for use in desserts or preserves. Rich in vitamin C, they also provide iron and other minerals.

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▪ fruit plant
 fruit plant of eight main species of the genus Fragaria (family Rosaceae), native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere but widely cultivated in the Southern Hemisphere as well. The cultivated varieties are mainly derived from two species, F. virginiana and F. chiloensis, that are native to the Americas. The strawberry is a low-growing, herbaceous plant with a fibrous root system and a crown from which arise basal leaves. The leaves are compound, with three leaflets, sawtooth-edged and hairy. The flowers, generally white, rarely reddish, are borne in small clusters on slender stalks arising, like the surface-creeping stems, from the axils of the leaves. As a plant ages, the root system becomes woody, and the “mother” crown sends out runners that touch ground and root, thus enlarging the plant.

      The strawberry fruit in the botanical sense is not a berry and is much more than a single fruit; it is the greatly enlarged stem end, or receptacle, in which are partially embedded the many true fruits, or achenes, popularly called seeds. Rich in vitamin C, the strawberry also provides iron and other minerals. It is eaten fresh as a dessert fruit, used as a pastry or pie filling, and may be preserved in many ways. The strawberry shortcake, made of fresh strawberries, sponge cake, and whipped cream, is a traditional American dessert.

      The cultivated, large-fruited strawberry originated in Europe in the 18th century. Most countries developed their own varieties during the 19th century, and these are often specially suitable for the climate, day length, altitude, or type of production required in a particular region.

      The strawberry succeeds on a surprisingly wide range of soils and situations and, compared with other horticultural crops, has a low fertilizer requirement. It is, however, susceptible to drought and requires moisture-retaining soil or irrigation by furrow or sprinkler. Runner plants are planted in early autumn if a crop is required the next year. If planted in winter or spring, the plants are deblossomed to avoid a weakening crop the first year. Plants are usually retained for one to four years. Runners may be removed from the spaced plants, or a certain number may be allowed to form a matted row alongside the original parent plants. The spaced plants per acre vary from 7,000 to 17,000. In areas with severe winters, plants are put out in the spring and protected during following winters by covering the rows with straw or mulches.

      Strawberries are produced commercially both for immediate consumption and for processing as frozen, canned, or preserved berries or as juice. In all countries, because of the perishable nature of the berries and the unlikelihood of mechanical picking, the strawberry is generally grown near centres of consumption or processing and where sufficient labour is available. The berries are picked directly into small baskets and crated for marketing or put into trays for processing. Early crops can be produced under glass or plastic covering. Strawberries are very perishable and require cool, dry storage. They are grown throughout most of the United States and Canada; in European countries, including France, Italy, the United Kingdom, Bulgaria, and Poland; in southern and eastern Africa; in New Zealand and Australia; and also in Japan.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • strawberry — [strô′ber΄ē, strô′bər ē] n. pl. strawberries [ME strawberi < OE streawberie < streaw, straw + berige, berry: prob. from the small achenes] 1. the small, red, fleshy accessory fruit of a stolon bearing plant (genus Fragaria) of the rose… …   English World dictionary


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