sorcery


sorcery
/sawr"seuh ree/, n., pl. sorceries.
the art, practices, or spells of a person who is supposed to exercise supernatural powers through the aid of evil spirits; black magic; witchery.
[1250-1300; ME sorcerie < ML sorceria. See SORCERER, -Y3]
Syn. enchantment. See magic.

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▪ occult practice
      the practice of malevolent magic, derived from casting lots as a means of divining the future in the ancient Mediterranean world. Some scholars distinguish sorcery from witchcraft by noting that it is learned rather than intrinsic. Other scholars, noting that modern witches claim to learn their craft, suggest that sorcery's intent is always evil and that of witchcraft can be either good or bad. In the early Christian era, the term was applied to any magician or wizard but by the Middle Ages only to those who allegedly practiced magic intended to harm others. In Western popular culture, and in Western children's literature in particular, the sorcerer often assumes a more positive guise.

      The sorcerer has traditionally been feared, in part because of his supposed knowledge of the occult and especially because of his understanding of poisons. Indeed, in the 13th and 14th centuries, most trials for “ witchcraft” involved deaths attributed to malevolent magic but which were probably caused by poisoning. In a famous case in 1324 in Ireland, Lady Alice Kyteller was charged with performing magical rites, having sexual intercourse with demons, attempting to divine the future, and poisoning her first three husbands. In the Malleus maleficarum (1486, “The Hammer of Witches”), the famous witch-hunter's manual, Dominicans Heinrich Krämer and Jacob Sprenger associated the practice of sorcery with a group of “witches” who allegedly practiced satanism. As a result of their work and that of others in the 13th–15th centuries, witchcraft was understood as a Christian heresy, and sorcery, like the practice of magic in general, was believed to be an integral part of a witch's dealings with the devil.

      In the early modern period, those who were known to pronounce curses were guilty of sorcery. Notably, the witchcraft trials in Salem, Massachusetts, in the 17th century were rooted in accusations against two women who had allegedly cursed their neighbour's cows and caused them to stop producing milk. Contemporary witches, or Wiccans (Wicca), do not practice Satanism and have denounced the practice of malevolent magic.

John Gordon Melton

Additional Reading
Charles Alva Hoyt, Witchcraft, 2nd ed. (1989); and Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic: Studies in Popular Beliefs in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century England (1971, reissued 1978), are helpful introductions to the history and practice of magic, religion, and witchcraft.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

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