slate


slate
slate1
/slayt/, n., v., slated, slating.
n.
1. a fine-grained rock formed by the metamorphosis of clay, shale, etc., that tends to split along parallel cleavage planes, usually at an angle to the planes of stratification.
2. a thin piece or plate of this rock or a similar material, used esp. for roofing or as a writing surface.
3. a dull, dark bluish gray.
4. a list of candidates, officers, etc., to be considered for nomination, appointment, election, or the like.
5. clean slate, an unsullied record; a record marked by creditable conduct: to start over with a clean slate.
v.t.
6. to cover with or as with slate.
7. to write or set down for nomination or appointment: the district leader slated for city judge.
8. to plan or designate (something) for a particular place and time; schedule: The premiere was slated for January.
9. to censure or criticize harshly or violently; scold.
10. to punish severely.
[1300-50; ME sclate < MF esclate, fem. of esclat piece split off; see SLAT1]
slate2
/slayt/, v.t., slated, slating. Brit.
to sic or set a dog on (a person or animal).
[1300-50; ME slayten < ON *sleita; c. OE slaetan]

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Fine-grained, clayey metamorphic rock that splits readily into thin slabs that have great tensile strength and durability.

Some other rocks that occur in thin beds are improperly called slate because they can be used for roofing and similar purposes. True slates generally split not along the bedding plane but along planes of cleavage that may intersect the bedding plane at high angles. Slates may be black, blue, purple, red, green, or gray. Slate may be marketed either as dimension slate, used mainly for electrical panels, laboratory tabletops, roofing, and flooring, or as crushed slate, used on composition roofing, in aggregates, and as a filler.

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      fine-grained, clayey metamorphic rock that cleaves, or splits, readily into thin slabs having great tensile strength and durability; some other rocks that occur in thin beds are improperly called slate because they can be used for roofing and similar purposes. True slates do not, as a rule, split along the bedding plane but along planes of cleavage, which may intersect the bedding plane at high angles. Slate was formed under low-grade metamorphic conditions—i.e., under relatively low temperature and pressure. The original material was a fine clay, sometimes with sand or volcanic dust, usually in the form of a sedimentary rock (e.g., a mudstone or shale). The parent rock may be only partially altered so that some of the original mineralogy and sedimentary bedding are preserved; the bedding of the sediment as originally laid down may be indicated by alternating bands, sometimes seen on the cleavage faces. Cleavage is a super-induced structure, the result of pressure acting on the rock at some time when it was deeply buried beneath the Earth's surface. On this account, slates occur chiefly among older rocks, although some occur in regions in which comparatively recent rocks have been folded and compressed as a result of mountain-building movements. The direction of cleavage depends upon the direction of the stresses applied during metamorphism.

      Slates may be black, blue, purple, red, green, or gray. Dark slates usually owe their colour to carbonaceous material or to finely divided iron sulfide. Reddish and purple varieties owe their colour to the presence of hematite (iron oxide), and green varieties owe theirs to the presence of much chlorite, a green micaceous clay mineral. The principal minerals in slate are mica (in small, irregular scales), chlorite (in flakes), and quartz (in lens-shaped grains).

      Slates are split from quarried blocks about 7.5 cm (3 inches) thick. A chisel, placed in position against the edge of the block, is lightly tapped with a mallet; a crack appears in the direction of cleavage, and slight leverage with the chisel serves to split the block into two pieces with smooth and even surfaces. This is repeated until the original block is converted into 16 or 18 pieces, which are afterward trimmed to size either by hand or by means of machine-driven rotating knives.

      Slate is sometimes marketed as dimension slate and crushed slate (granules and flour). Dimension slate is used mainly for electrical panels, laboratory tabletops, roofing and flooring, and blackboards. Crushed slate is used on composition roofing, in aggregates, and as a filler. Principal production in the United States is from Pennsylvania and Vermont; northern Wales provides most of the slate used in the British Isles.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Slate — (sl[=a]t), n. [OE. slat, sclat, OF. esclat a shiver, splinter, F. [ e]clat, fr. OF. esclater to shiver, to chip, F. [ e]clater, fr. OHG. sleizen to tear, slit, split, fr. sl[=i]zan to slit, G. schleissen. See {Slit}, v. t., and cf. {Eclat}.] 1.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Slate — Slate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Slated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slating}.] 1. To cover with slate, or with a substance resembling slate; as, to slate a roof; to slate a globe. [1913 Webster] 2. To register (as on a slate and subject to revision), for an… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slate — slate1 [slāt] n. [ME sclate < OFr esclate, fem. of esclat: see SLAT1] 1. a hard, fine grained, metamorphic rock, typically formed from shale, that cleaves naturally into thin, smooth surfaced layers 2. a thin piece of slate or slatelike… …   English World dictionary

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  • slate — slate; slate·man; un·slate; …   English syllables

  • Slate — Slate, v. t. [Cf. AS. sl[=ae]ting a privilege of hunting.] To set a dog upon; to bait; to slat. See 2d {Slat}, 3. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.] [Written also {slete}.] Ray. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slate — [sle:t, engl. sleit] <zu engl. slate »Schiefer«> schiefergrau gefärbt (von Rauchwaren) …   Das große Fremdwörterbuch


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