skunk


skunk
/skungk/, n., pl. skunks, (esp. collectively) skunk, v.
n.
1. a small North American mammal, Mephitis mephitis, of the weasel family, having a black coat with a white, V-shaped stripe on the back, and ejecting a fetid odor when alarmed or attacked.
2. any of several related or similar animals. Cf. hog-nosed skunk, spotted skunk.
3. Informal. a thoroughly contemptible person.
4. U.S. Navy Slang. an unidentified ship or target.
v.t.
5. Slang. to defeat thoroughly in a game, esp. while keeping an opponent from scoring: The team skunked the favorites in the crucial game.
[1625-35, Amer.; < the Massachusett reflex of Proto-Algonquian *šeka·kwa (deriv. of *šek- urinate + -a·kw fox, foxlike animal]

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Any of several black-and-white New World species in the carnivore family Mephitidae that eject an odoriferous liquid (as far as 12 ft [3.7 m]) when threatened.

The liquid becomes a fine mist that causes tearing of the eyes and choking. Some scent-gland secretions are used in perfume. Species vary in colour pattern and size. Most are 18–37 in. (46–93 cm) long, including the bushy tail, and weigh 2–13 lb (1–6 kg); the two species of spotted skunk (genus Spilogale) are much smaller. Skunks eat rodents, insects, eggs, birds, and plants. The striped, or common, skunk (Mephitis mephitis) is a nocturnal feeder that occurs in most of North America. With its scent glands removed, it is sometimes kept as a pet. The common skunk is a major carrier of rabies, which is fatal to skunks. The seven species of hog-nosed skunk (genus Conepatus) have a long, bald snout. The hooded skunk (Mephitis macroura) has a neck ruff.

Striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

E.R. Degginger

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mammal
Introduction
also called  polecat 
 black-and-white mammal, found primarily in the Western Hemisphere, that uses extremely well-developed scent glands to release a noxious odour in defense. The term skunk, however, refers to more than just the well-known striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis). The skunk family is composed of 11 species, 9 of which are found in the Western Hemisphere. Primarily nocturnal, skunks are diverse carnivores that live in a wide variety of habitats, including deserts, forests, and mountains. Most are about the size of a housecat, but some are significantly smaller.

      The common striped skunk is found from central Canada southward throughout the United States to northern Mexico. Its fur is typically black with a white “V” down the back, and it has a white bar between the eyes, as does the rare hooded skunk (M. macroura) of the southwestern United States. In the hooded skunk stripes are not always present, and white areas on the back are interspersed with black fur, which gives it a gray appearance. The “hood” is the result of long hairs at the back of the neck.

      Spotted skunks (genus Spilogale) live from southwestern Canada to Costa Rica. Except for a white spot between the eyes, their spots are actually a series of interrupted stripes running down the back and sides. These are about the size of a tree squirrel and are the smallest skunks except for the pygmy spotted skunk (S. pygmaea), which can fit in a person's hand.

      The hog-nosed skunks (genus Conepatus) of North America can be larger than striped skunks, but those of Chile and Argentina are smaller. In the northern part of their range, they have a single solid white stripe starting at the top of the head that covers the tail and back. In Central and South America they have the typical “V” pattern. Hog-nosed skunks have no markings between the eyes.

      In the 1990s stink badgers (genus Mydaus, see badger) became classified as members of the family Mephitidae, and they thus are now considered skunks. Found only in the Philippines, Malaysia, and Indonesia, they resemble small North American hog-nosed skunks with shorter tails. Their white stripes can be divided, single and narrow, or absent.

Scent
      Skunk scent comes from anal glands located inside the rectum at the base of the tail. All carnivores have anal scent glands, but they are extremely well-developed in skunks. Each of the two glands has a nipple associated with it, and skunks can aim the spray with highly coordinated muscle control. When a skunk is being chased by a predator but cannot see it, the spray is emitted as an atomized cloud that the pursuer must run through. This usually is enough to deter most predators. When the skunk has a target to focus on, the spray is emitted as a stream directed at the predator's face. Although accurate to about two metres (more than six feet), its total range is considerably farther.

      A skunk will go through a series of threat behaviours before it sprays. Striped and hooded skunks will face an adversary head-on and stamp their front paws, sometimes charging forward a few paces or edging backward while dragging their front paws. When they actually spray, they can simultaneously face their head and tail at the antagonist. Hog-nosed skunks stand up on their hind paws and slam their front paws to the ground while hissing loudly. Spotted skunks perform a handstand and approach predators. Stink badgers snarl, show their teeth, and stamp their forefeet. They also have been observed to feign death, with the anal area directed at the observer. The chemical composition of skunk spray differs among species, but sulfur compounds ( thiols and thioacetates) are primarily responsible for its strength.

Natural history
      Hog-nosed skunks are capable diggers and have powerfully built upper bodies, which allow them to climb in rough terrain. Spotted skunks are the most agile, able to climb squirrel-like both up and down trees. Striped skunks spend most of their time on the ground and are less agile than spotted skunks. Striped skunks are omnivorous, feasting on insects, small vertebrates, and eggs, as well as vegetable matter. Hog-nosed skunks and stink badgers have elongated snouts adapted to rooting for grubs and other insects in the soil; they too rely on a variety of foods. Spotted skunks are the most carnivorous.

      Skunks remain solitary except during breeding season, though in colder climates females may den together. After mating, the male is driven off, and the female raises the litter of 2 to 12 offspring (kits) alone. Kits are born from about the end of April through early June. Breeding occurs in the spring, except in the Western spotted skunk (S. gracilis), which breeds in the autumn but undergoes a period of delayed implantation lasting about 150 days. Eastern spotted skunks (S. putorius) breed at the same time of year as other skunks, which results in both species' producing litters at the same time.

      Striped skunks are common throughout their range, but population estimates for other species are uncertain. The Eastern spotted skunk may be on the decline throughout its range, but no skunks are listed as endangered species. Despite their unique system of defense, they are eaten, chiefly by great horned owls but also by eagles, crows, vultures, coyotes, foxes, dogs, bobcats, mountain lions, American badgers, and even humans. Stink badgers are preyed upon by civets, cats, and humans. Automobiles are a major cause of mortality for skunks in the United States.

Importance to man
      Skunk pelts (especially striped) were once valuable in the fur industry but are less so today. Living skunks are more valuable, as most prey primarily on insects, especially those harmful to agriculture. They are also very useful in destroying rats and mice that commonly infest farm buildings. Spotted skunks are particularly efficient hunters because they are quick and are able to follow rodents into smaller spaces than can larger skunks. The earliest legislation for the protection of skunks was passed in 1894 and grew out of appeals from hop growers in New York. In some areas of North America, skunks are a major carrier of rabies, which is fatal to skunks. Striped skunks can be tamed but do not generally make good pets.

Paleontology and classification
      Skunks have long been classified as a subfamily of the weasel family (Mustelidae (mustelid)). Genetic data, however, suggest placement of skunks in their own family, Mephitidae (mephitis being Latin for “bad odour”). The oldest fossil identified as a skunk dates to 11–12 million years ago and was discovered in Germany. Genetic data indicate the family originated about 30–40 million years ago. Stink badgers were formerly included in the badger subfamily of the Mustelidae, but comparative anatomy and genetic data were used to reclassify them with skunks.

Family Mephitidae (skunks)
 There has been some debate as to the number of genera and species within the family. Two species of stink badgers were thought to be distinct genera but here are referred to as a single genus. The eastern and western spotted skunks had been classified as a single species, but genetic and reproductive data warrant separate recognition. Chromosomal data suggest that additional species may be identified in Central America.
      Genus Conepatus (hog-nosed skunks)
 4 species found in North and South America.

      Genus Spilogale (spotted skunks)
 3 species found in North and Central America.

      Genus Mephitis (striped skunk and hooded skunk)
 2 species found in North America.

      Genus Mydaus (stink badgers)
 2 species found in Southeast Asia.

Jerry Dragoo

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Universalium. 2010.

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