Shu


Shu
/shooh/, n. Egyptian Religion.
the god of the air, sometimes represented with arms upraised, supporting the vault of heaven. Cf. Nut.

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I
(907–65) Ancient name for Sichuan and the name of two of the 10 kingdoms included in China's Ten Kingdoms period (907–с 980), specifically the Qian (Former) Shu (907–25) and the Hou (Later) Shu (934–65).

The kingdom of Shu was located in present-day Sichuan. Aside from 10 years of instability that occurred between the two Shu regimes, the area experienced peace and prosperity. Poetry flourished, as did Buddhism and Taoism. See also Five Dynasties, Three Kingdoms.
II
In Egyptian religion, the god of the air and supporter of the sky, created by the god Atum.

Shu and his sister Tefnut (goddess of moisture) were the first couple of the group of nine gods called the Ennead of Heliopolis. Of their union were born Geb and Nut. Shu was portrayed in human form with an ostrich feather on his head. He was often represented supporting with uplifted arms the body of Nut arched above him. Later he was frequently termed the son of Re, and he was also identified with Onuris, a warrior god.
III
(as used in expressions)
Shu ching
Tung Chung shu
Shu Sheyu
Shu Qingchun
Shu Maung

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▪ Egyptian god
 in Egyptian religion, god of the air and supporter of the sky, created by Atum by his own power, without the aid of a woman. Shu and his sister and companion, Tefnut (goddess of moisture), were the first couple of the group of nine gods called the Ennead of Heliopolis. Of their union were born Geb, the earth god, and Nut, the goddess of the sky. Shu was portrayed in human form with the hieroglyph of his name, an ostrich feather, on his head. He was often represented separating Geb and Nut, supporting with uplifted arms the body of Nut arched above him. In some Middle Kingdom texts Shu was given the status of a primeval creator god. Later he was frequently termed the “Son of Re” (the sun god), and he was also identified with Onuris, a warrior god, thus acquiring martial associations.

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Universalium. 2010.