sheep


sheep
sheepless, adj.sheeplike, adj.
/sheep/, n., pl. sheep.
1. any of numerous ruminant mammals of the genus Ovis, of the family Bovidae, closely related to the goats, esp. O. aries, bred in a number of domesticated varieties.
2. leather made from the skin of these animals.
3. a meek, unimaginative, or easily led person.
4. separate the sheep from the goats, to separate good people from bad or those intended for a specific end from unqualified people.
[bef. 900; ME; OE (north) scep; c. D schaap, G Schaf]

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I
Ruminants (bovid genus Ovis) that have scent glands in the face and hind feet.

Horns, if present, are more divergent than those of goats. Species range from 80 to 400 lb (35 to 180 kg). The coat of wild species consists of outer hair underlain by wool. Sheep graze in flocks, preferably on short, fine grasses and legumes. They have been domesticated from at least 5000 BC in the Middle East, Europe, and Central Asia. Most domesticated breeds produce fine wool; the few that produce only hair or coarse or long wool are generally raised for meat. The flesh of mature sheep is called mutton; that of immature sheep is called lamb.
II
(as used in expressions)

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  ruminant (cud-chewing) mammal of the genus Ovis. The sheep is usually stockier than its relative the goat; its horns, when present, are more divergent; it has scent glands in its face and hind feet; and the males lack the beards of goats. Sheep usually have short tails. In all wild species of sheep, the outer coat takes the form of hair, and beneath this lies a short undercoat of fine wool that has been developed into the fleece of domesticated sheep. Male sheep are called rams, the females ewes, and immature animals lambs. Mature sheep weigh from about 80 to as much as 400 pounds (35 to 180 kg). To browse sheep by breed, see below (sheep).

 A sheep regurgitates its food and chews the cud, thus enabling its four separate stomach compartments to thoroughly digest the grasses and other herbage that it eats. The animals prefer grazing on grass or legume vegetation that is short and fine, though they will also consume high, coarse, or brushy plants as well. They graze plants closer to the root than do cattle, and so care must be taken that sheep do not overgraze a particular range. Sheep are basically timid animals who tend to graze in flocks and are almost totally lacking in protection from predators. They mature at about one year of age, and many breed when they reach the age of about one and a half years. Most births are single, although sheep do have twins on occasion. The lambs stop suckling and begin to graze at about four or five months of age.

      Sheep were first domesticated from wild species of sheep at least 5000 BC, and their remains have been found at numerous sites of early human habitation in the Middle East, Europe, and Central Asia. Domesticated sheep are raised for their fleece (wool), for milk, and for meat. The flesh of mature sheep is called mutton; (mutton) that of immature animals is called lamb. There were estimated to be more than one billion sheep in the world in the early 21st century. The major national producers are Australia, New Zealand, China, India, the United States, South Africa, Argentina, and Turkey. Countries that have large areas of grassland are the major producers.

 Domestic sheep differ from their wild progenitors and among themselves in conformation, quantity and quality of fleece, colour, size, milk production, and other characteristics. Most breeds of domesticated sheep produce wool, while a few produce only hair, and wild sheep grow a combination of wool and hair. Several hundred different breeds of sheep have been developed to meet environmental conditions influenced by latitudes and altitudes and to satisfy human needs for clothing and food. Breeds of sheep having fine wool are generally raised for wool production alone, while breeds with medium or long wool or with only hair are generally raised for meat production. Several crossbreeds have been developed that yield both wool and meat of high quality, however. Of the more than 200 breeds of sheep in the world, the majority are of limited interest except in local areas. For articles on individual breeds of sheep, see Cheviot; Hampshire; Karakul; Merino; Rambouillet; Shropshire.

       Selected Breeds of Sheep Selected Breeds of SheepThe table provides a comparison of selected breeds of sheep.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sheep — Sheep, n. sing. & pl. [OE. shep, scheep, AS. sc?p, sce[ a]p; akin to OFries. sk?p, LG. & D. schaap, G. schaf, OHG. sc[=a]f, Skr. ch[=a]ga. [root]295. Cf. {Sheepherd}.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any one of several species of ruminants of the genus {Ovis},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sheep — W3S2 [ʃi:p] n plural sheep [: Old English; Origin: sceap] 1.) a farm animal that is kept for its wool and its meat ▪ Sheep were grazing on the hillside. ▪ a sheep farmer flock of sheep (=a group of sheep) →↑lamb1 …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • sheep — sheep·berry; sheep; sheep·cote; sheep·faced; sheep·ish; sheep·less; sheep·man; sheep·cot; sheep·faced·ly; sheep·faced·ness; sheep·ish·ly; sheep·ish·ness; …   English syllables

  • sheep — [ ʃip ] (plural sheep) noun count ** 1. ) an animal kept by farmers for its wool or meat. The male sheep is called a ram and the female is a ewe. A young sheep is called a lamb. Meat from a young sheep is called lamb and from an older sheep is… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • sheep — [shēp] n. pl. sheep [ME schep < OE sceap, scæp, akin to Ger schaf: known only in WGmc] 1. any of a wide variety of bovid ruminants, with horns in both sexes; esp., the domesticated sheep (Ovis aries), having heavy wool, edible flesh called… …   English World dictionary

  • Sheep — Chanson par Pink Floyd extrait de l’album Animals Pays  Royaume Uni Sortie …   Wikipédia en Français

  • sheep — (n.) O.E. sceap, scep, from W.Gmc. *skæpan (Cf. O.S. scap, O.Fris. skep, M.L.G. schap, M.Du. scaep, Du. schaap, O.H.G. scaf, Ger. Schaf), of unknown origin. Not found in Scandinavian or Gothic, and with no known cognates outside Germanic. The… …   Etymology dictionary

  • sheep|y — «SHEE pee», adjective, sheep|i|er, sheep|i|est. characteristic of or resembling sheep; sheeplike; sheepish: »He called the social English the most sheepy of sheep (Geo …   Useful english dictionary

  • sheep — ► NOUN (pl. same) 1) a domesticated ruminant mammal with a thick woolly coat, kept in flocks for its wool or meat. 2) a person who is too easily influenced or led. 3) a member of a minister s congregation. ● make sheep s eyes at Cf. ↑make sheep s …   English terms dictionary

  • Sheep —    SHEEP, an isle, in the parish of Southend, county of Argyll. This is a small island, lying southward of the peninsula of Cantyre, and close to the island of Sanda. It is well calculated for the pasturage of a small number of sheep, from which… …   A Topographical dictionary of Scotland

  • SHEEP —    Sheep and goats, which had been reared since the Neolithic in central Italy, continued to form an important component of the agricultural system together with cattle and pigs …   Historical Dictionary of the Etruscans


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