sensation


sensation
sensationless, adj.
/sen say"sheuhn/, n.
1. the operation or function of the senses; perception or awareness of stimuli through the senses.
2. a mental condition or physical feeling resulting from stimulation of a sense organ or from internal bodily change, as cold or pain.
3. Physiol. the faculty of perception of stimuli.
4. a general feeling not directly attributable to any given stimulus, as discomfort, anxiety, or doubt.
5. a mental feeling, esp. a state of excited feeling.
6. a state of excited feeling or interest caused among a number of persons or throughout a community, as by some rumor or occurrence.
7. a cause of such feeling or interest: The new Brazilian movie was the sensation of the film festival.
[1605-15; < ML sensation- (s. of sensatio), equiv. to LL sensat(us) SENSATE + -ion- -ION]
Syn. 2, 4. See sense. 6. excitement, stimulation, animation; agitation, commotion, perturbation.

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Mental process (such as seeing, hearing, or smelling) due to immediate bodily stimulation, usually as distinguished from perception.

When a stimulus impinges on a sense organ and the organism responds, it is said that the stimulus has been sensed. See also psychophysics, sense-data.

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      in neurology and psychology, any concrete, conscious experience resulting from stimulation of a specific sense organ, sensory nerve, or sensory area in the brain. The word is used in a more general sense to indicate the whole class of such experiences. In ordinary speech the word is apt to be ambiguous; it is frequently used in such a way as to leave uncertain whether the speaker is referring to the process of sensing or to whatever it is that is being sensed (e.g., the apparent painful stimulus, sound of a bell, or red glow of a fire). This double meaning has produced confusion about whether or not sensations are purely mental (as opposed to physical). Though the process of sensing is thought by some to be purely mental, some psychologists and philosophers hold that what is sensed is normally a physical quality existing independently of mind: e.g., the grass is literally green whether or not any person is present to perceive it. To avoid this ambiguity, Bertrand Russell, in England, introduced the term sense-datum to signify what is sensed or “given in sensation”; the word sensation is then reserved for a so-called mental process or activity.

      More empirically inclined psychologists and physiologists prefer to regard sensation as a concept (not a datum) defined in terms of dependent relationships between discriminatory responses of organisms and properties of physical stimuli. Characteristics of sensory functions may be ascertained by training a laboratory animal or asking a human being to respond differentially to various aspects of the stimulus. In this approach sensation is seen much as sensing is regarded in modern automated devices. Sensing elements (sensors) in automated systems indicate characteristics (presence, absence, intensity, or degree) of some form of energy impinging on them. These sensors are called transducers; (transducer) they convert their input energy into electrical currents that can be used as signals. The definition of sensation in terms of discriminative responses in living organisms is analogous. When a stimulus impinges on a sense organ and the organism responds appropriately, it is said that the stimulus has been sensed. Nonetheless, a mentalistic definition of sensation is seen by many as basic to the psychology of sensation. See also psychophysics.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:
(without perception or a reference to any object that causes the feeling), , / ,


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