segmentation


segmentation
/seg'meuhn tay"sheuhn/, n.
1. division into segments.
2. Biol.
a. the subdivision of an organism or of an organ into more or less equivalent parts.
b. cell division.
[1850-55; SEGMENT + -ATION]

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also called  metamerism, or metameric segmentation 

      in zoology, the condition of being constructed of a linear series of repeating parts, each being a metamere (body segment, or somite) and each being formed in sequence in the embryo, from anterior to posterior. All members of three large animal phyla are metameric: Annelida, Arthropoda, and Chordata (chordate). The first two exhibit conspicuous segmentation in the adult. Among the chordates, the repetitive metameric pattern is evident in muscles, vertebrae, and ribs of the adult (e.g., fishes), but even when less obvious (e.g., mammals), the development of each individual is based firmly on formation of segments, the embryological somites (q.v.). Segments of the tapeworm (proglottids) are formed so differently from the segments of the other three groups that most zoologists do not admit tapeworms to be metamerically segmented animals. Since the metamerism of Annelida and Arthropoda and that of Chordata probably arose independently, metamerism does not itself imply relationships between the groups; however, the particular metamerism within each group clearly demonstrates the derivative relationship of its members.

      Among acanthocephalans, rotifers, and some other “aschelminth” groups, external ringlike formations, called annulations, occur in the covering tissues, sometimes so marked as to suggest segmentations; these formations prove to be only superficial, however, and are not indicative of true segmentation.

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Universalium. 2010.

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