scissors


scissors
/siz"euhrz/, n.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) a cutting instrument for paper, cloth, etc., consisting of two blades, each having a ring-shaped handle, that are so pivoted together that their sharp edges work one against the other (often used with pair of).
2. (used with a sing. v.) Gymnastics. any of several feats in which the legs execute a scissorlike motion.
3. (used with a sing. v.) Wrestling. a hold secured by clasping the legs around the body or head of the opponent.
[1350-1400; ME cisoures, sisoures < MF cisoires < ML *cisoria, pl. of LL cisorium cutting tool (see CHISEL); current sp. by association with L scindere to cut (ptp. scissus), ML scissor tailor]

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Cutting instrument or tool consisting of a pair of opposed metal blades that meet and cut when the handles at their ends are brought together.

Modern scissors are of two types: the more usual pivoted blades have a rivet or screw connection between the cutting ends and the handle ends; spring shears have a C-shaped spring connection at the handle ends.

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tool
      cutting instrument consisting of a pair of opposed metal blades that meet and cut when the handles at their ends are brought together. The term shears sometimes denotes large-size scissors. Modern instruments are of two types: the more usual pivoted blades have a rivet or screw connection between the cutting ends and the handle ends; spring shears have a C-shaped spring connection at the handle ends.

      Spring-type scissors probably date from the Bronze Age and were commonly used in Europe until the end of the Middle Ages. Pivoted scissors of bronze and iron were used in ancient Rome and in China, Japan, and Korea. In Europe their domestic use dates from the 16th century, but not until 1761, when Robert Hinchliffe of Sheffield, Eng., first used cast steel in their manufacture, did large-scale production begin. In the 19th century much hand-forged work was produced, with elaborately ornamented handles. By the end of the 19th century, styles were simplified for mechanical-production methods.

      The two blades are made to twist or curve slightly toward one another so that they touch in only two places: at the pivot, or joint, and at the spot along the blades where the cutting is taking place. When completely closed, the points of the blades touch. In the case of the finest cutting instruments, the two unfinished metal blanks and the fasteners are coded with an identifying mark so they can be manufactured as a set.

      Blanks are usually made from red-hot steel bars that are forged at high speed between the dies of drop hammers, but others also of satisfactory quality may be made from cold-forged blanks. The steel may contain from 0.55 to 1.03 percent carbon, the higher carbon content providing a harder cutting steel for certain applications. Stainless steel is used for surgical scissors. Certain nonferrous alloys that will not produce sparks or interfere with magnetism are employed in making scissors for cutting cordite and magnetic tape. Handle and blade are usually constructed in one piece, but in some cases the handles are electrically welded to the steel blades.

      Expert sharpening is required to restore the edge-angle sharpness; each blade is passed smoothly and lightly across a grinding wheel, following the twist of the blade, with an even pressure throughout the stroke to avoid causing ridges or other irregularities.

      A special form of shears used for sheet-metal work, called tin shears, or tin snips, is equipped with high-leverage handles to facilitate cutting the metal. Another special form, pruning shears, are designed for trimming shrubs and trees.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Scissors — are hand operated cutting instruments consisting of a pair of metal blades connected in such a way that the blades meet and cut materials placed between them when the handles are brought together. They are used for cutting various thin materials …   Wikipedia

  • scissors — is treated as a plural noun in its basic meaning (The scissors are in the drawer), but has a singular use in certain sports, where it is usually elliptical for a longer phrase such as scissors movement or scissors pass (The ordinary scissors is… …   Modern English usage

  • Scissors — Scis sors, n. pl. [OE. sisoures, OF. cisoires (cf. F. ciseaux), probably fr. LL. cisorium a cutting instrument, fr. L. caedere to cut. Cf. {Chisel}, {Concise}. The modern spelling is due to a mistaken derivation from L. scissor one who cleaves or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scissors — Scissors, TX U.S. Census Designated Place in Texas Population (2000): 2805 Housing Units (2000): 673 Land area (2000): 1.707375 sq. miles (4.422082 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.707375 sq.… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Scissors, TX — U.S. Census Designated Place in Texas Population (2000): 2805 Housing Units (2000): 673 Land area (2000): 1.707375 sq. miles (4.422082 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 1.707375 sq. miles (4.422082 …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • scissors — ► PLURAL NOUN 1) (also a pair of scissors) an instrument used for cutting cloth and paper, consisting of two crossing blades pivoted in the middle and operated by thumb and fingers inserted in rings at each end. 2) (also scissor) (before another… …   English terms dictionary

  • scissors — [siz′ərz] n. [ME sisoures < OFr cisoires < LL cisoria, pl. of cisorium, cutting tool < L caedere, to cut: E sp. altered by assoc. with L scissor, one who cuts < scissus, pp. of scindere, to cut] 1. [also with pl. v.] a cutting… …   English World dictionary

  • scissors — late 14c., sisoures, from O.Fr. cisoires (pl.) shears, from V.L. *cisoria (pl.) cutting instrument, from *cisus (in compounds such as L. excisus, pp. of excidere to cut out ), ultimately from L. caedere to cut (see CIDE (Cf. cide)). Spelling with …   Etymology dictionary

  • scissors — n. 1) to use scissors 2) to sharpen scissors 3) bandage (AE); manicure; nail scissors 4) a pair of scissors * * * [ sɪzəz] manicure nail scissors a pair of scissors to sharpen scissors to use scissors …   Combinatory dictionary

  • scissors —    As with *knives and other sharp objects, tradition dictates that anyone who receives scissors as a present must give the donor a coin, otherwise the gift will cut the love between them. The earliest known references (1507 and 1611) relate to… …   A Dictionary of English folklore


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