satellite


satellite
satellited, adj.
/sat"l uyt'/, n.
1. Astron. a natural body that revolves around a planet; a moon.
2. a country under the domination or influence of another.
3. something, as a branch office or an off-campus facility of a university, that depends on, accompanies, or serves something else.
4. an attendant or follower of another person, often subservient or obsequious in manner.
5. a device designed to be launched into orbit around the earth, another planet, the sun, etc.
adj.
6. of, pertaining to, or constituting a satellite: the nation's new satellite program.
7. subordinate to another authority, outside power, or the like: summoned to a conference of satellite nations.
[1540-50; 1955-60 for def. 2; < L satellit- (s. of satelles) attendant, member of bodyguard or retinue]
Syn. 4. follower, supporter, companion, associate; lackey, parasite, sycophant, toady, flunky.

* * *

I
Natural object (moon) or spacecraft (artificial satellite) orbiting a larger astronomical body.

Most known natural satellites orbit planets; the Earth's Moon is the most obvious example and was the only one known until the discovery of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter in 1610. All the solar system's planets except Mercury and Venus have moons, which vary greatly in size, composition (from rock to mostly ice), and activity (from cold and inert to volcanic). Some asteroids are also known to have their own moons. The first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, was launched into orbit around Earth in 1957. Since then, thousands have been sent into orbit around Earth as well as the Moon, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and other bodies. Artificial satellites are used for scientific research and other purposes, such as communication (see communications satellite), weather forecasting, Earth resources management, and military intelligence. See also Landsat.
II
(as used in expressions)
Earth Resources Technology Satellites

* * *

 natural object (moon) or spacecraft (artificial satellite) orbiting a larger astronomical body. Most known natural satellites orbit planets; the Earth's Moon is the most obvious example.

      All the planets in the solar system except Mercury and Venus have natural satellites. More than 130 such objects have so far been discovered, with Jupiter and Saturn together contributing about two-thirds of the total. The planets' natural satellites vary greatly in size. Some of them measure less than 10 km (6 miles) in diameter, as in the case of some of Jupiter's moons. A few are larger than Mercury—for example, Saturn's Titan and Jupiter's Ganymede, each of which is more than 5,000 km (about 3,100 miles) in diameter. The satellites also differ significantly in composition. The Moon, for example, consists almost entirely of rocky material. On the other hand, the composition of Saturn's Enceladus is 50 percent or more ice. Some asteroids (asteroid) are known to have their own tiny moons.

 Artificial satellites (Earth satellite) can be either unmanned (robotic) or manned. The first artificial satellite to be placed in orbit was the unmanned Sputnik 1, launched October 4, 1957, by the Soviet Union. Since then, thousands have been sent into Earth orbit (Earth satellite). Various robotic artificial satellites have also been launched into orbit around Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn, as well as around the Moon and the asteroid Eros. Spacecraft of this type are used for scientific research and for other purposes, such as communication, weather forecasting, navigation and global positioning, Earth resources management, and military intelligence. Examples of manned satellites include space stations, space shuttle orbiters circling Earth, and Apollo (Apollo program) spacecraft in orbit around the Moon or Earth. (For a comprehensive discussion of robotic and manned orbiting spacecraft, see space exploration.)
 

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • satellite — [ satelit ] n. m. • satelite v. 1265; lat. satelles, satellitis « garde du corps » I ♦ 1 ♦ (1665) Corps céleste gravitant sur une orbite elliptique autour d une planète. La Lune est le satellite de la Terre. Les satellites de Jupiter. Satellite… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • satellite — sat‧el‧lite [ˈsætlaɪt] noun 1. [countable, uncountable] a machine that has been sent into space and goes around the Earth, used for radio, television, and other electronic communication: • a satellite communications company • They provide news… …   Financial and business terms

  • Satellite 5 — is a major location in the 2005 series of the British science fiction series Doctor Who . In the series, it is first seen in the year 200,000 and is the main setting for the episode The Long Game . It reappears six episodes later in the two part… …   Wikipedia

  • Satellite — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Satellite Álbum de P.O.D. Publicación 11 de septiembre de 2001 Grabación Mayo de 2001 …   Wikipedia Español

  • Satellite — steht für: Satellite Awards, Auszeichnungen für besondere Leistungen in den Bereichen Film, Fernsehen, DVD und Neue Medien Satellite Tour, heute Challenge Tour, eine jährliche Serie von Golfturnieren XM Satellite Radio, US amerikanischer… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Satellite — Sat el*lite, n. [F., fr. L. satelles, itis, an attendant.] 1. An attendant attached to a prince or other powerful person; hence, an obsequious dependent. The satellites of power. I. Disraeli. [1913 Webster] 2. (Astron.) A secondary planet which… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • satellite TV — satellite television UK / US or satellite TV UK / US noun [uncountable] television programmes that are sent to your television using satellite communications …   English dictionary

  • Satellite — Sat el*lite, a. (Anat.) Situated near; accompanying; as, the satellite veins, those which accompany the arteries. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • satellite — 1540s, follower or attendant of a superior person, from M.Fr. satellite (14c.), from L. satellitem (nom. satelles) attendant, perhaps from Etruscan satnal (Klein), or a compound of roots *satro full, enough + *leit to go (Tucker); Cf. English… …   Etymology dictionary

  • satellite — satellite. См. спутник. (Источник: «Англо русский толковый словарь генетических терминов». Арефьев В.А., Лисовенко Л.А., Москва: Изд во ВНИРО, 1995 г.) …   Молекулярная биология и генетика. Толковый словарь.

  • satellite — index offshoot, partisan Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.