SAMOS


SAMOS
/sam"ohs/, n.
one of a series of U.S. reconnaissance satellites.
[s(atellite) a(nti)m(issile) o(bservation) s(ystem)]

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Island (pop., 1991: 42,000), Greece.

In the Aegean Sea, Sámos is located off the western coast of Turkey, from which it is separated by the Sámos Strait. Wooded and mountainous, the island has an area of 184 sq mi (476 sq km). Settled by the Ionians in the 11th century BC, it was a leading commercial centre of Greece by the 7th century BC. It was noted for its cultural achievements, especially in sculpture, during the 6th-century-BC reign of Polycrates. Ruled successively by Persia, Athens, Sparta, Rome, Byzantium, and Turkey, it was annexed to Greece in 1912. The island is fertile and produces wine, olives, fruit, cotton, and tobacco.

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Modern Greek  Sámos 

      Greek island in the Aegean Sea, the closest one to the mainland of Asia Minor, from which it is separated by the narrow Samos Strait. The 184-sq-mi (476-sq-km) island is wooded and mountainous; Mt. Kerketeus, the highest peak (4,701 ft [1,433 m]), forms the western tip of the island. The east coast is amply indented, but the smoother south coast has broad, deep plains except around the port of Tigáni, which is hemmed in by hills. With Ikaría and the Foúrnoi islands, it forms the nomós (department) of Sámos, whose capital, Vathí, is at the head of a narrow, deepwater bay on the north coast.

      The island's earliest settlers were of obscure origins, but there is evidence of Early Neolithic occupancy on the south coast, near Tigáni. About the 11th century BC the Ionians appeared, and by the 7th century the island was one of the leading commercial centres of Greece, trading with Black Sea peoples, Egypt, Cyrene (Libya), Corinth, and Chalcis and becoming a bitter rival of Miletus.

      The Samian landed oligarchy was overturned (in 540 BC) by the tyrant Polycrates, bringing on what was perhaps the golden age of Samos. He ruled in alliance with the Egyptian pharaoh and had a powerful fleet that blockaded the Persian-controlled mainland until his death c. 522. Darius of Persia then took Samos and partially depopulated it. In following decades the Samians alternately supported Persia and Athens, but after the defeat of Athens in the Peloponnesian War, Spartan hegemony replaced the Athenian. Briefly independent after 394, the island then fell alternately under Persian and Athenian sway, was caught up in rivalries between Asia Minor and Egypt during most of the 3rd century, and in 189 was recognized as a free territory by Rome and given to the kings of Pergamum in Asia Minor. In 133 and again in 88 it revolted against Rome and forfeited its autonomy.

      Under Byzantine rule Samos was for a time head of the Aegean military district. After the 13th century it passed to a Genoese trading company, and in 1453 it fell to the Turks in such a depopulated condition that they settled Albanians and other peoples there. During the War of Greek Independence (1821–29) Samos revolted against Turkey and gained its freedom, but in 1832 it was handed back to Turkey to be administered by a Turkish-appointed Greek governor. Annexation to Greece came in 1912 after a brief bombardment by two Italian warships caused the Turks to evacuate.

      The island remains fertile; land is devoted to vineyards, olive trees, and fruit, cotton, and tobacco production. Its wines are exported to western Europe. Near Tigáni, archaeologists uncovered the remains of a late 5th-century-BC temple and sanctuary of Hera. Samos was the birthplace of the philosopher and mathematician Pythagoras and the seat of a school of sculptors. Another Pythagoras, a Samian-born sculptor, achieved works cited by the ancient historians Pliny and Pausanias. Pop. (1981) 40,519.

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Universalium. 2010.

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