Salerno


Salerno
/seuh lair"noh, -lerr"-/; It. /sah lerdd"naw/, n.
a seaport in SW Italy: taken by U.S. forces September 1943. 161,598.

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City (pop., 2001 prelim.: 144,078), southern Italy.

Located on the Gulf of Salerno, it was founded by the Romans in 197 BC on the site of an earlier town. Part of a Lombard duchy from AD 646, it was the capital of an independent Lombard principality from 839 to с 1076. It was then conquered by the Norman Robert Guiscard and became his capital. It was later incorporated into the Kingdom of Naples. During World War II, Salerno's coast was the scene of a major battle (September 1943) between Allied landing forces and German troops. It is an active seaport in an industrial area; its landmarks include a medical school (the earliest in Europe, probably founded in the 9th century) and the cathedral (845, rebuilt 1076–85) that contains the tombs of St. Matthew and Pope Gregory VII.

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Italy
Latin  Salernum,  
 city, Campania regione, southern Italy. It lies west of the mouth of the Irno River on the Gulf of Salerno, southeast of Naples. The Roman colony of Salernum was founded in 197 BC on the site of an earlier town, possibly Etruscan, called Irnthi. Part of the Lombard duchy of Benevento from AD 646, it became the capital of an independent Lombard principality in 839 until it was conquered by the Norman Robert Guiscard and became his splendid capital. Sacked by the Swabian Hohenstaufens in 1194, it revived under Giovanni da Procida, hero of the war of the Sicilian Vespers against the French (1282) and a native of Salerno, who enlarged the port and started a great annual fair. In 1419 Salerno passed to the Colonna and later to the Orsini and the Sanseverino before reverting to the Kingdom of Naples.

      Much of Salerno's historic interest derives from its medical school—the earliest in Europe—which flourished there in the 11th and 12th centuries and to which flocked students from Europe, Asia, and northern Africa; it still exists.

      In World War II, the Salerno coast was the scene of a battle (Sept. 8–18, 1943) between Allied landing forces and the Germans. Parts of the old episcopal city suffered great damage before the British 8th Army arrived from Calabria and forced the Germans to withdraw.

      Ruins of the castle of Arechi, prince of Benevento, and the remains of a palace survive from the Lombard period; but the city's principal monument is the San Matteo (St. Matthew) Cathedral founded in 845 and rebuilt in 1076–85 by Robert Guiscard. In the crypt is the sepulchre of St. Matthew, whose body, according to legend, was brought to Salerno in the 10th century. The cathedral also contains the tomb of Pope Gregory VII.

      An active Tyrrhenian seaport, Salerno is on the Naples–Reggio di Calabria railway. The city's main industrial products and exports are foodstuffs, construction materials, textiles, machinery, ceramics, and wrought ironwork. Pop. (2006 est.) mun., 134,820.

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Universalium. 2010.

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