sago


sago
/say"goh/, n.
a starchy foodstuff derived from the soft interior of the trunk of various palms and cycads, used in making puddings.
[1545-55; earlier sagu < Malay]

* * *

Food starch prepared from carbohydrate material stored in the trunks of several palms, chiefly Metroxylon rumphii and M. sagu, sago palms native to Indonesia.

Composed of 88% carbohydrate, sago is a basic food of the South Pacific, where it is used in meal form to prepare soups, cakes, and puddings. Elsewhere its use in cookery is mainly as a pudding and sauce thickener. In industry it is used as a textile stiffener. The thick trunk grows to 30 ft (9 m) tall in low marshy areas. At 15 years the core of the mature trunk is engorged with starchy material. If allowed to form and ripen, the fruit absorbs the starch, leaving the stem hollow and dying. Cultivated plants thus are cut down when the flower spike appears, and the starchy pith is extracted from the stems.

* * *

starch
      food starch prepared from carbohydrate material stored in the trunks of several palms, the main sources being Metroxylon rumphii and M. sagu, sago palms native to the Indonesian archipelago.

      Sago palms grow in low marshy areas, usually reaching a height of nearly 9 m (30 feet) and developing thick trunks. The plant matures in 15 years, producing an inflorescence, or flower spike, and the pith, or central portion, of the stem becomes gorged with starchy material. When fruit is allowed to form and ripen, it absorbs the starch, leaving the stem hollow, and the tree dies after the fruit ripens. Cultivated plants are cut down when the flower spike appears, and their stems are divided into sections and split open so that the starchy pith may be extracted. The extracted material is grated to make a powder, which is kneaded with water over a strainer, through which the starch passes into a trough below, leaving any woody fibre behind. After several washings the resulting sago meal is ready for local use. When prepared for export, sago meal is mixed with water to form a paste and rubbed through sieves of various sizes, producing grains sold as pearl or bullet sago, depending upon their size.

      Sago is almost pure starch, being composed of 88 percent carbohydrate, 0.5 percent protein, and minute amounts of fat, and contains only a trace of B vitamins. It is a basic food of the southwest Pacific area, where it is used in meal form to prepare soups, cakes, and puddings. Elsewhere, its use in cookery is mainly as a pudding and sauce thickener. In industry it is used as a textile stiffener.

      In Indonesia, sago forests are especially extensive on the Island of Ceram. Borneo, producing much of the sago imported into Europe, has added new plantings as a result of increased demand. Other Indonesian palms that are sources of sago include the gomuti palm (Arenga pinnata), the kittul palm (Caryota urens), and the cabbage palm (Corypha umbraculifera). Two South American species yielding sago are Mauritia flexuosa and Guilielma gasipaes.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sago — is a starch extracted from the pith inside stems of the sago palm Metroxylon sagu . Sago forms a major staple food for the lowland peoples of New Guinea and the Moluccas where it is called sagu and traditionally is cooked and eaten in the form of …   Wikipedia

  • Sago — Sa go (s[=a] g[ o]), n. [Malay. s[=a]gu.] A dry granulated starch imported from the East Indies, much used for making puddings and as an article of diet for the sick; also, as starch, for stiffening textile fabrics. It is prepared from the stems… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sago — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda El sago era una vestidura militar que los romanos tomaron de los griegos o de los galos. El sago es una especie de manto cuadrado que no pasaba de las rodillas y se ponía encima de los demás vestidos ajustándose por… …   Wikipedia Español

  • sago — SAGÓ s.n. Produs alimentar în formă de praf sau de grăuncioare albe sau roşietice, preparat din fecula sagotierului şi care se consumă fiert în supă sau în lapte. – Din fr. sagou. Trimis de LauraGellner, 17.07.2004. Sursa: DEX 98  ságo s. n.… …   Dicționar Român

  • Sago — Sm (Stärke aus dem Mark der Sagopalme) per. Wortschatz fach. (18. Jh.) Entlehnung. Entlehnt aus ne. sago, dieses aus mal. sāgū Mark . Die Sache wurde von Marco Polo im 13. Jh. nach Venedig gebracht.    Ebenso nndl. sago, ne. sago, nfrz. sagou,… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • sago — [sā′gō] n. pl. sagos [Malay sagu, flour from the pith of the sago palm] 1. an edible starch, also used in sizing textiles, prepared from the pith of the trunk of certain palms, from the underground stems of certain cycads, as the coontie, or from …   English World dictionary

  • sago — ► NOUN 1) edible starch obtained from a palm, dried and processed to produce a flour or granules. 2) (also sago pudding) a sweet dish made from sago and milk. ORIGIN Malay …   English terms dictionary

  • Sago — (Grana sago), Nahrungsmittel aus dem Marke mehrer ostindischen Palmenarten (Cycas circinalis, revoluta, Sagus Rumphii u. bes. Sagus farinifera), von denen mancher Stamm mehre hundert Pfund Mark enthält. Er wird durch Kneten mit Wasser, öfteres… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • sago — (del lat. «sagum»; ant.) m. Sayo. * * * sago. (Del lat. sagum). m. desus. sayo …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • sago — sȃgo m DEFINICIJA 1. bot. malajska palma (Metroxylon rumphii) iz stabljičine srži dobiva se škrob koji je važan dio prehrane lokalnog stanovništva 2. kuglasta zrna škroba dobivena iz srčike sago palmi; palmina riža ETIMOLOGIJA port. ← mal. sagu …   Hrvatski jezični portal

  • Sago — (Sagu, in der Papuasprache soviel wie Brot), ein Stärkemehlpräparat, das besonders in Indien und auf dem Archipel aus den Stämmen von zwei Palmen, Metroxylon laeve und M. Rumphii (s. Tafel »Nahrungspflanzen I«, Fig. 6, mit Text), auch aus M.… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.