sack


sack
sack1
sacklike, adj.
/sak/, n.
1. a large bag of strong, coarsely woven material, as for grain, potatoes, or coal.
2. the amount a sack holds.
3. a bag: a sack of candy.
4. Slang. dismissal or discharge, as from a job: to get the sack.
5. Slang. bed: I bet he's still in the sack.
6. Also, sacque.
a. a loose-fitting dress, as a gown with a Watteau back, esp. one fashionable in the late 17th century and much of the 18th century.
b. a loose-fitting coat, jacket, or cape.
7. Baseball. a base.
8. South Midland U.S. the udder of a cow.
9. hit the sack, Slang. to go to bed; go to sleep: He never hits the sack before midnight.
10. hold the sack. See bag (def. 18).
v.t.
11. to put into a sack or sacks.
12. Football. to tackle (the quarterback) behind the line of scrimmage before the quarterback is able to throw a pass.
13. Slang. to dismiss or discharge, as from a job.
14. sack out, Slang. to go to bed; fall asleep.
[bef. 1000; 1940-45 for def. 5; ME sak (n.), sakken (v.), OE sacc (n.) < L saccus bag, sackcloth < Gk sákkos < Sem; cf. Heb saq]
Regional Variation. See bag.
sack2
/sak/, v.t.
1. to pillage or loot after capture; plunder: to sack a city.
n.
2. the plundering of a captured place; pillage: the sack of Troy.
[1540-50; < MF phrase mettre à sac to put to pillage; sac, in this sense < It sacco looting, loot, shortened form of saccomano < MHG sakman pillager (conformed to sacco SACK1)]
Syn. 1. spoil, despoil. See rob. 2. looting; destruction, ruin.
sack3
/sak/, n.
a strong light-colored wine formerly imported from Spain and the Canary Islands.
[1525-35; < F (vin) sec dry (wine) < L siccus dry; cf. SEC1]

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Sack — Sack …   Deutsch Wörterbuch

  • Sack — Sack, n. [OE. sak, sek, AS. sacc, s[ae]cc, L. saccus, Gr. sa kkos from Heb. sak; cf. F. sac, from the Latin. Cf. {Sac}, {Satchel}, {Sack} to plunder.] 1. A bag for holding and carrying goods of any kind; a receptacle made of some kind of pliable… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sack: Das altgerm. Substantiv mhd., ahd. sac, got. sakkus (»Trauer , Bußgewand aus grobem Stoff«), niederl. zak, aengl. sacc > engl. sack (daneben aengl. sæcc, das die nord. Sippe von entsprechend schwed. säck lieferte) beruht auf einer sehr… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • sack — Ⅰ. sack [1] ► NOUN 1) a large bag made of a material such as hessian or thick paper, used for storing and carrying goods. 2) (the sack) informal dismissal from employment. 3) (the sack) informal bed. ► VERB informal …   English terms dictionary

  • Sack AS-6 — V1 Beschreibung Status Versuchsflugzeug Besatzung 1 Abmessungen Länge 6.4 m Spannweite 5.0 m Höhe 2.56 m Tragfläche 19.62 m² Gewich …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • SACK — ist eine Abkürzung für Selective Acknowledgment. TCP SACK ist eine Erweiterung des TCP Protokolls, die für bessere Performance bei Paketverlusten sorgt. SACK ermöglicht, dass bei Paketverlusten nicht der gesamte Inhalt des TCP Windows, sondern… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • sack — sack1 [sak] n. [ME sak < OE sacc, akin to OHG sac, Goth sakkus < early Gmc borrowing < L saccus, bag, in LL(Ec), sackcloth garment < Gr sakkos < Sem: cf. Heb sak, Akkadian shaqqu, sackcloth] 1. a) a bag, esp. a large one of coarse… …   English World dictionary

  • Sack — (s[a^]k), n. [OE. seck, F. sec dry (cf. Sp. seco, It. secco), from L. siccus dry, harsh; perhaps akin to Gr. ischno s, Skr. sikata sand, Ir. sesc dry, W. hysp. Cf. {Desiccate}.] A name formerly given to various dry Spanish wines. Sherris sack.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sack, v. t. 1. To put in a sack; to bag; as, to sack corn. [1913 Webster] Bolsters sacked in cloth, blue and crimson. L. Wallace. [1913 Webster] 2. To bear or carry in a sack upon the back or the shoulders. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sack, n. [F. sac plunder, pillage, originally, a pack, packet, booty packed up, fr. L. saccus. See {Sack} a bag.] The pillage or plunder, as of a town or city; the storm and plunder of a town; devastation; ravage. [1913 Webster] The town was… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sack — Sm std. (8. Jh.), mhd. sac m./n., ahd. sac, as. sakk Entlehnung. Wie gt. sakkus, ae. sacc früh entlehnt aus l. saccus, das über gr. sákkos auf assyr. šak̇k̇u Sack, Büßergewand zurückgeht. Auf eine Nebenform mit j führen anord. sekkr, ae. sæcc.… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache