rustication


rustication
/rus'ti kay"sheuhn/, n.
1. Also called rustic work. Archit. any of various forms of ashlar so dressed and tooled that the visible faces are raised above or otherwise contrasted with the horizontal and usually the vertical joints.
2. the act of a person or thing that rusticates.
[1615-25; < L rustication- (s. of rusticatio). See RUSTICATE, -ION]

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In architecture, decorative masonry achieved by cutting back the edges of stones to a plane surface while leaving the central portion of the face either rough or projecting markedly.

Rustication provides a rich, bold surface for exterior walls. It was used as early as the 6th century BC in the tomb of Cyrus the Great. Italian early Renaissance architects used rustication to decorate palaces. In the Mannerist (late Renaissance) and Baroque periods, rustication assumed great importance in garden and villa design. Fantastic surfaces were achieved, as in vermiculated work, in which the surface is covered with wavy, serpentine patterns or vertical, dribbled forms.

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 in architecture, type of decorative masonry achieved by cutting back the edges of stones to a plane surface while leaving the central portion of the face either rough or projecting markedly. Rustication provides a rich and bold surface for exterior masonry walls.

      Rusticated masonry is found as early as the platform of the tomb of Cyrus II (the Great) at Pasargadae in Persia (560 BC) and was commonly used for Greek and Hellenistic retaining walls and terraces. It was similarly used by the Romans (ancient Rome), who also rusticated such utilitarian structures as aqueducts. The Romans also realized the purely ornamental value of rustication and used it decoratively in such structures as the Porta Maggiore at Rome (1st century AD), in which the rustication is rough, and the Temple of Augustus at Vienne, France, in which it is carefully finished.

      Early Renaissance Italian architects further developed the tradition of rustication, using it effectively to decorate palaces in the 15th century. Thus, in the Pitti Palace (1458), the Medici-Riccardi Palace (1444–59), and the Strozzi Palace (c. 1489), all in Florence, carefully designed rustication is the chief ornamental element. During the Mannerist and Baroque periods, rustication assumed great importance in garden and villa design. Fantastic surfaces were employed on the projecting portions of the stones, such as vermiculated work, in which the surface is covered with wavy, serpentine sinkages or is treated with vertical, dribbled forms. Sometimes the stones had sides beveled and brought to an abrupt point, or ridge, in the centre. The use of rustication was introduced into England by Inigo Jones (Jones, Inigo) and became a dominant feature in much English stonework during the 17th and 18th centuries.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rustication — Rus ti*ca tion, n. [L. rusticatio.] 1. The act of rusticating, or the state of being rusticated; specifically, the punishment of a student for some offense, by compelling him to leave the institution for a time. [1913 Webster] 2. (Arch.) Rustic… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rustication — 1620s, from L. rusticationem (nom. rusticatio) act or fact of living in the country, noun of action from pp. stem of rusticari live or stay in the country, from rusticus (see RUSTIC (Cf. rustic)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • Rustication — Things commonly known as rustication include: * Rustication is a process in Smoking pipe creation / refinishing where the surface of the pipe is given a texture or design by removing some of the material, often used to give a pipe the appearance… …   Wikipedia

  • Rustication —    The term refers to large blocks of stone that are roughly cut and applied to building façades to grant a bold surface texture. The use of rustication allows for statements of masculinity and power, as the Palazzo Medici Riccardi in Florence… …   Dictionary of Renaissance art

  • rustication — rusticate ► VERB 1) Brit. suspend (a student) from a university as a punishment (used chiefly at Oxford and Cambridge). 2) fashion (masonry) in large blocks with sunken joints and a roughened surface. DERIVATIVES rustication noun. ORIGIN… …   English terms dictionary

  • rustication — noun see rusticate …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • rustication — noun a) the act of rusticating (transitive verb sense) b) the act of being rusticated (intransitive verb sense) See Also: rusticate …   Wiktionary

  • rustication — rus·ti·ca·tion || ‚rÊŒstɪ keɪʃn n. act of rusticating; act of living in a rural area; temporary suspension from a university (British); roughly cut bricks or stones used in a wall covering …   English contemporary dictionary

  • rustication — rus·ti·ca·tion …   English syllables

  • rustication — Taking a trip to the countryside …   Grandiloquent dictionary


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