Rum


Rum
/rddoohm/, n.
Arabic name of Rome, once used to designate the Byzantine Empire.

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Distilled liquor made from sugarcane products, primarily molasses.

It is first mentioned in records from Barbados с 1650. Rum figured in the slave trade: slaves from Africa were traded in the West Indies for molasses, the molasses was made into rum in New England, and the rum was then traded to Africa for more slaves. British sailors received regular rum rations from the 18th century until the 1970s. Two major types are marketed. The light-bodied rums, traditionally of Puerto Rico and Cuba, employ cultivated yeast and are distilled in continuous-operation stills before being blended and aged one to four years. The heavier dark rums, traditionally of Jamaica, employ yeast spores from the air and are distilled in simple pot stills before being blended and aged five to seven years. Rum is drunk straight or mixed and is used in dessert sauces and other dishes.

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liquor
      distilled liquor made from sugarcane products, usually produced as a by-product of sugar manufacture. It includes both the light-bodied rums, typified by those of Cuba and Puerto Rico, and the heavier and fuller-flavoured rums of Jamaica.

      Rums originated in the West Indies and are first mentioned in records from Barbados in about 1650. They were called “kill-devil” or “rumbullion” and by 1667 were simply called rum. Rum figured in the slave trade of the American colonies: slaves were brought from Africa and traded to the West Indies for molasses; the molasses was made into rum in New England; and the rum was then traded to Africa for more slaves. British sailors received regular rations of rum from the 18th century until 1970. Rum, the major liquor distilled during the early history of the United States, was sometimes mixed with molasses and called blackstrap or mixed with cider to produce a beverage called stonewall.

      Most rums are made from molasses, the residue remaining after sugar has been crystallized from sugarcane juice, containing as much as 5 percent sugar. Some countries import molasses for use in rum production. Where sugar industries are undeveloped, rum is often made with sugarcane juice. A low-quality spirit, called tafia, is made from impure molasses or other sugarcane residue, but it is not considered a true rum and is seldom exported.

      The sugar necessary for fermentation is already present in the raw material, and rum retains more of the original raw-material taste than most other spirits. The characteristic flavour of specific rums is determined by the type of yeast employed for fermentation, the distillation method, aging conditions, and blending.

      The heavy, dark, and full-bodied rums are the oldest type and have strong molasses flavour. They are primarily produced in Jamaica, Barbados, and Demerara in Guyana. Such rums are usually produced from molasses enriched with the skimmings, or dunder, remaining in the boilers used for sugar production. This liquid attracts yeast spores from the air, resulting in spontaneous, or natural, fermentation. The resulting slow fermentation period allows full development of flavour substances. The rum is distilled twice in simple pot stills, producing a distillate of clear colour that turns to a golden hue as the distillate takes up substances from the oak of the wooden puncheons used for storage during the aging period. Colour is deepened by the addition of caramel after aging. The Jamaican rums are always blended and are aged for at least five to seven years. They are usually marketed with an alcohol content of 43–49 percent by volume (86–98 U.S. proof). New England rum, made in the United States for over 300 years, has strong flavour and high alcohol content. Batavia arak is a pungent rum produced on the Indonesian island of Java.

      The production of dry, light-bodied rums began in the late 19th century. This type, produced mainly in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, employs cultured yeast in fermentation, and distillation is accomplished in modern, continuous-operation patent stills. The rums are usually blended and are aged from one to four years. Those rums marketed as white-label types are pale in colour and mild in flavour; a gold-label rum has a more amber colour and more pronounced and sweeter flavour, resulting from longer aging and the addition of caramel.

      Straight rum is a popular drink in rum-producing countries. Elsewhere, rum is usually consumed in mixed drinks, with light rums preferred for such cocktails as the daiquiri and dark rums used in such tall drinks as the rum Collins. Rum is frequently used as a flavouring in dessert sauces and other dishes. It is also used to flavour tobacco.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Rum — Rum, n. [probably shortened from Prov. E. rumbullion a great tumult, formerly applied in the island of Barbadoes to an intoxicating liquor.] A kind of intoxicating liquor distilled from cane juice, or from the scummings of the boiled juice, or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rum — Sm erw. fach. (17. Jh.) Entlehnung. Vermutlich über nndl. rum entlehnt aus ne. rum, das vermutlich auf Barbados aus älterem rumbullion Aufruhr gekürzt wurde. Dieses ist unklarer Herkunft.    Ebenso nndl. rum, ne. rum, nfrz. rhum, nschw. rom, nisl …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

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