rhyme


rhyme
rhymer, n.
/ruym/, n., v., rhymed, rhyming.
n.
1. identity in sound of some part, esp. the end, of words or lines of verse.
2. a word agreeing with another in terminal sound: Find is a rhyme for mind and womankind.
3. verse or poetry having correspondence in the terminal sounds of the lines.
4. a poem or piece of verse having such correspondence.
5. verse (def. 4).
6. rhyme or reason, logic, sense, or plan: There was no rhyme or reason for what they did.
v.t.
7. to treat in rhyme, as a subject; turn into rhyme, as something in prose.
8. to compose (verse or the like) in metrical form with rhymes.
9. to use (a word) as a rhyme to another word; use (words) as rhymes.
v.i.
10. to make rhyme or verse; versify.
11. to use rhyme in writing verse.
12. to form a rhyme, as one word or line with another: a word that rhymes with orange.
13. to be composed in metrical form with rhymes, as verse: poetry that rhymes.
Also, rime.
[1250-1300; ME rime < OF, deriv. of rimer to rhyme < Gallo-Romance *rimare to put in a row OHG rim series, row; prob. not connected with L rhythmus rhythm, although current sp. (from c1600) appar. by assoc. with this word]

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Type of echoing produced by the close placement of two or more words with similarly sounding final syllables.

Rhyme is used in poetry (and occasionally in prose) to produce sounds that appeal to the ear and to unify and establish a poem's stanzaic form. End rhyme (i.e., rhyme used at the end of a line to echo the end of another line) is most common, but internal rhyme (occurring before the end of a line) is frequently used as an embellishment. Types of "true rhyme" include masculine rhyme, in which the two words end with the same vowel-consonant combination (stand/land); feminine rhyme (or double rhyme), in which two syllables rhyme (profession/discretion); and trisyllabic rhyme, in which three syllables rhyme (patinate/latinate).

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▪ poetic device
also spelled  rime 

      the correspondence of two or more words with similar-sounding final syllables placed so as to echo one another. Rhyme is used by poets and occasionally by prose writers to produce sounds appealing to the reader's senses and to unify and establish a poem's stanzaic form. end rhyme (i.e., rhyme used at the end of a line to echo the end of another line) is most common, but internal, interior, or leonine rhyme is frequently used as an occasional embellishment in a poem—e.g., William Shakespeare's “Hark; hark! the lark at heaven's gate sings,” or as part of the regular rhyme scheme:

And the silken sad uncertain rustling of eachpurple curtain
Thrilled me—filled me with fantastic terrorsnever felt before
So that now, to still the beating of my heart,I stood repeating:
“Tis some visitor entreating entrance atmy chamber door.”

(Edgar Allan Poe, “The Raven”)

      There are three rhymes recognized by purists as “true rhymes”: masculine rhyme, in which the two words end with the same vowel–consonant combination (stand / land), feminine rhyme (sometimes called double rhyme), in which two syllables rhyme (profession / discretion), and trisyllabic rhyme, in which three syllables rhyme (patinate / latinate). The too-regular effect of masculine rhyme is sometimes softened by using trailing rhyme, or semirhyme, in which one of the two words trails an additional unstressed syllable behind it (trail / failure). Other types of rhyme include eye rhyme, in which syllables are identical in spelling but are pronounced differently (cough / slough), and pararhyme, first used systematically by the 20th-century poet Wilfred Owen (Owen, Wilfred), in which two syllables have different vowel sounds but identical penultimate and final consonantal groupings (grand / grind). Feminine pararhyme has two forms, one in which both vowel sounds differ, and one in which only one does (ran in / run on; blindness / blandness). Weakened, or unaccented, rhyme occurs when the relevant syllable of the rhyming word is unstressed (bend / frightened). Because of the way in which lack of stress affects the sound, a rhyme of this kind may often be regarded as consonance, which occurs when the two words are similar only in having identical final consonants (best / least).

      Another form of near rhyme is assonance, in which only the vowel sounds are identical (grow / home). Assonance was regularly used in French poetry until the 13th century, when end rhyme overtook it in importance. It continues to be significant in the poetic technique of Romance languages but performs only a subsidiary function in English verse.

      Many traditional poetic forms utilize set rhyme patterns—for example, the sonnet, villanelle, rondeau, ballade, chant royal, triolet, canzone, and sestina. Rhyme seems to have developed in Western poetry as a combination of earlier techniques of end consonance, end assonance, and alliteration. It is found only occasionally in classical Greek and Latin poetry but more frequently in medieval religious Latin verse and in songs, especially those of the Roman Catholic liturgy, from the 4th century. Although it has been periodically opposed by devotees of classical verse, it has never fallen into complete disuse. Shakespeare interspersed rhymed couplets into the blank verse of his dramas; Milton disapproved of rhyme, but Samuel Johnson favoured it. In the 20th century, although many advocates of free verse ignored rhyme, other poets continued to introduce new and complicated rhyme schemes.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rhyme — Rhyme, n. [OE. ryme, rime, AS. r[=i]m number; akin to OHG. r[=i]m number, succession, series, G. reim rhyme. The modern sense is due to the influence of F. rime, which is of German origin, and originally the same word.] [The Old English spelling… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rhyme — [rīm] n. [ME rime < OFr < rimer, to rhyme, prob. < Frank * rim, row, series, akin to OE, OHG rim, series, number < IE * rei (> OIr rim, number) < base * are , to join, fit (> ART1, RATIO, RITE): form infl. by assoc. with L… …   English World dictionary

  • Rhyme — Rhyme, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Rhymed};p. pr. & vb. n. {Rhyming}.] [OE. rimen, rymen, AS. r[=i]man to count: cf. F. rimer to rhyme. See {Rhyme}, n.] 1. To make rhymes, or verses. Thou shalt no longer ryme. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] There marched the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Rhyme — Rhyme, v. t. 1. To put into rhyme. Sir T. Wilson. [1913 Webster] 2. To influence by rhyme. [1913 Webster] Hearken to a verser, who may chance Rhyme thee to good. Herbert. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rhyme — [n] poetry in which lines end with like sounds alliteration, beat, cadence, couplet, doggerel, half rhyme, harmony, iambic pentameter, measure, meter, nursery rhyme, ode, poem, poesy, poetry, rhythm, rune, slant rhyme, song, tune, verse, vowel… …   New thesaurus

  • rhyme — ► NOUN 1) correspondence of sound between words or the endings of words, especially when used in poetry. 2) a short poem with rhyming lines. 3) rhyming poetry or verse. 4) a word with the same sound as another. ► VERB 1) (of a word, syllable, or… …   English terms dictionary

  • Rhyme — A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds in two or more words and is most often used in poetry and songs. The word rhyme may also refer to a short poem, such as a rhyming couplet or other brief rhyming poem such as nursery rhymes. Contents 1… …   Wikipedia

  • rhyme — rhyme1 [raım] n [Date: 1100 1200; : Old French; Origin: rime, probably from Latin rhythmus; RHYTHM] 1.) a short poem or song, especially for children, using words that rhyme ▪ a collection of traditional rhymes with illustrations →↑nursery rhyme… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • rhyme — [[t]ra͟ɪm[/t]] rhymes, rhyming, rhymed 1) V RECIP ERG If one word rhymes with another or if two words rhyme, they have a very similar sound. Words that rhyme with each other are often used in poems. [V with n] June always rhymes with moon in old… …   English dictionary

  • rhyme — I UK [raɪm] / US noun Word forms rhyme : singular rhyme plural rhymes * 1) [countable] a short poem, often for children, that has lines ending in the same sound 2) a) [countable] a word that ends with the same sound as another word rhyme for: Can …   English dictionary


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