recession


recession
recession1
/ri sesh"euhn/, n.
1. the act of receding or withdrawing.
2. a receding part of a wall, building, etc.
3. a withdrawing procession, as at the end of a religious service.
4. Econ. a period of an economic contraction, sometimes limited in scope or duration. Cf. depression (def. 7).
[1640-50; < L recession- (s. of recessio). See RECESS, -ION]
recession2
/ree sesh"euhn/, n.
a return of ownership to a former possessor.
[1885-90; RE- + CESSION]

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Downward trend in the business cycle characterized by a decline in production and employment, which in turn lowers household income and spending.

Even though not all households and businesses experience actual declines in income, they become less certain about the future and consequently delay making large purchases or investments. Consumers buy fewer durable household goods, and businesses are less likely to purchase machinery and equipment and more likely to use up existing inventory instead of adding goods to their stock. This drop in demand leads to a corresponding fall in output and thus worsens the economic situation. Whether a recession develops into a severe and prolonged depression depends on a number of circumstances. Among them are the extent and quality of credit extended during the previous period of prosperity, the amount of speculation permitted, the ability of government monetary and fiscal policies to reverse (or minimize) the downward trend, and the amount of excess productive capacity. Compare depression.

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      in economics, a downward trend in the business cycle characterized by a decline in production and employment, which in turn causes the incomes and spending of households to decline. Even though not all households and businesses experience actual declines in income, their expectations about the future become less certain during a recession and cause them to delay making large purchases or investments.

      In recessions, the decline in output can be traced to a reduction in purchases of durable household goods by consumers and of machinery and equipment by businesses, and a reduction in additions of goods to stocks or inventories. The greatest effect is probably on inventory; businesses stop adding to their inventories and become more willing to draw on them to fill production orders. Inventory declines thus have a double impact on production volume.

      Whether a recession develops into a severe and prolonged depression depends on a number of circumstances. Among them are the extent and quality of credit extended during the previous period of prosperity, the amount of speculation permitted, the ability of monetary policy and fiscal policy to reverse the downward trend, and the amount of excess productive capacity in existence. (See also money.)

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • Recession — Re*ces sion, n. [Pref. re + cession.] The act of ceding back; restoration; repeated cession; as, the recession of conquered territory to its former sovereign. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Recession — Re*ces sion (r[ e]*s[e^]sh [u^]n), n. [L. recessio, fr. recedere, recessum. See {Recede}.] 1. The act of receding or withdrawing, as from a place, a claim, or a demand. South. [1913 Webster] Mercy may rejoice upon the recessions of justice. Jer.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • recession — ► NOUN ▪ a temporary economic decline during which trade and industrial activity are reduced. DERIVATIVES recessionary adjective …   English terms dictionary

  • recession — recession1 [ri sesh′ən] n. [L recessio < pp. of recedere: see RECEDE1] 1. a going back or receding; withdrawal 2. a procession leaving a place of assembly 3. a receding part, as of a wall 4. Econ. a temporary falling off of business activity… …   English World dictionary

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  • recession — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ bad, deep, major, serious, severe, sharp, steep ▪ It was the worst recession since the war. ▪ …   Collocations dictionary


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