Raymond


Raymond
/ray"meuhnd/, n.
1. Henry Jarvis /jahr"vis/, 1820-69, U.S. publicist: founder of The New York Times.
2. a male given name: from Germanic words meaning "counsel" and "protection."

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(as used in expressions)
Aron Raymond Claude Ferdinand
Raymond Walter Goulding
Chandler Raymond Thornton
Tyrus Raymond Cobb
Dart Raymond Arthur
Flatt Lester Raymond
Hood Raymond Mathewson
Kroc Raymond Albert
Leavis Frank Raymond
Raymond Lully
Loewy Raymond Fernand
McCarthy Joseph Raymond
Moley Raymond Charles
Poincaré Raymond
Pompidou Georges Jean Raymond
Queneau Raymond
Raymond Nicholas Kienzle
Raymond of Saint Gilles
Raymond of Peñafort Saint
Raymond Antonin
Toulouse Lautrec Monfa Henri Marie Raymond de
White Byron Raymond

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▪ prince of Antioch
byname  Raymond of Poitiers , French  Raimond de Poitiers 
born c. 1099
died June 29, 1149

      prince of Antioch (1136–49) who successfully resisted the attempts of the Byzantine emperor John II (John II Comnenus) to establish control over the principality.

      Raymond was the younger son of William VII, count of Poitiers, in west-central France. In 1135 King Fulk of the Latin kingdom of Jerusalem, regent for the heiress Constance of Antioch, sent envoys to offer her in marriage to Raymond, who was then at the court of Henry I of England. Raymond arrived in Antioch in April 1136 and married the nine-year-old Constance, thereby becoming ruler of Antioch.

      The Byzantine Empire had claimed Antioch ever since the First Crusade (1095–99), when the Crusaders had promised to hand over the city to the empire but instead had kept it themselves. In August 1137 Emperor John II Comnenus arrived at Antioch and forced Raymond to agree to cede Antioch to him in exchange for territory around Aleppo—provided it could be captured from the Muslims. In April and May 1138 Raymond and John battled the Muslims with some success. John then made a solemn entry into Antioch, but Raymond managed to evade John's request for control of the citadel, and John soon left.

      In September 1142 John, who was campaigning in Syria, again demanded that Antioch be handed over to him in exchange for a yet-to-be-conquered principality. Raymond barred the Byzantines from the city, and they then prepared to invade Antioch. John died, however, in April 1143, and Raymond, attempting to take advantage of John's death, invaded Cilicia to the north but was repulsed and driven back to Antioch. The Byzantines then ravaged the country north of the city, while their fleet raided the coast of the principality. The following year Edessa fell to the Muslims, exposing Antioch to attack from the northeast. Therefore, Raymond visited Constantinople in 1145 to conciliate John's successor, Manuel I.

      In the spring of 1148, when Louis VII of France and his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine, who were participating in the Second Crusade, visited Antioch, Raymond wisely urged Louis to attack Aleppo, the northern Syrian base of the Muslim leader Nūr al-Dīn. For religious reasons, however, Louis decided to campaign closer to Jerusalem and the Holy Sepulchre. Raymond's relations with Eleanor, his niece, gave rise to scandalous rumours. When Eleanor took her uncle's side concerning the attack on Aleppo, Louis placed her under house arrest and took her and his troops to Jerusalem. In 1149 Raymond was slain in a battle against Nūr al-Dīn.

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Universalium. 2010.

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