qasida


qasida
/keuh see"deuh/, n., pl. qasida, qasidas. Pros.
an Arabic poem, usually in monorhyme, that may be satirical, elegiac, threatening, or laudatory.
[1810-20; < Ar qasidah]

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▪ poetic form
plural  qasida,  also spelled  kasida,  Arabic  qaṣīdah 

      poetic form developed in pre-Islamic Arabia and perpetuated throughout Islamic literary history into the present. It is a laudatory, elegiac, or satiric poem that is found in Arabic, Persian, and many related Asian literatures. The classic qasida is an elaborately structured ode of 60 to 100 lines, maintaining a single end rhyme that runs through the entire piece; the same rhyme also occurs at the end of the first hemistich (half-line) of the first verse. Virtually any metre is acceptable for the qasida except the rajaz, which has lines only half the length of those in other metres.

      The qasida opens with a short prelude, the nasib, which is elegiac in mood and is intended to gain the audience's involvement. The nasib depicts the poet stopping at an old tribal encampment to reminisce about the happiness he shared there with his beloved and about his sorrow when they parted; Imruʾ al-Qays is said to have been the first to use this device, and nearly all subsequent authors of qasida imitate him. After this conventional beginning follows the rahil, which consists of descriptions of the poet's horse or camel or of desert animals and scenes of desert events and Bedouin life and warfare; it may conclude with a piece on fakhr, or self-praise. The main theme, the madih, or panegyric, often coupled with hijaʾ (satire of enemies), is last and is the poet's tribute to himself, his tribe, or his patron.

      The qasida has always been respected as the highest form of the poetic art and as the special forte of the pre-Islamic poets. While poets with a classical tendency maintained the genre, with its confining rules, the changed circumstances of the Arabs made it an artificial convention. Thus, by the end of the 8th century the qasida had begun to decline in popularity. It was successfully restored for a brief period in the 10th century by al-Mutanabbi (Mutanabbī, al-) and has continued to be cultivated by the Bedouin. Qasida were also written in Persian, Turkish, and Urdu until the 19th century.

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  • Qasida — (also spelled qasidah ) in Arabic: قصيدة, plural qasā id , قــصــائـد; in Persian: قصیده (or چكامه, chakameh ), is a form of poetry from pre Islamic Arabia. It typically runs more than 50 lines, and sometimes more than 100. It was later inherited …   Wikipedia

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  • qasida — sustantivo femenino 1. Uso/registro: literario. Casida …   Diccionario Salamanca de la Lengua Española

  • Qasida — Le qasida (aussi transcrit qasîda, qaçida ou qasideh et ghasideh) en arabe قصيدة, en persan قصیده, est une forme de poésie originaire de l Arabie pré islamique. Elle a typiquement une longueur de 50 vers, parfois plus de 100. Cette forme a… …   Wikipédia en Français

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  • qasida — noun /kaˈsiːdə,kəˈsidə/ An Arabic or Persian elegiac monorhyme poem, usually having a tripartite structure. He was delighted to hear some music and listened with emotion to the wild qasidas that the old man sang – songs of the Arab canon full of… …   Wiktionary

  • qasida — qa·si·da …   English syllables