Punch


Punch
/punch/, n.
1. the chief male character in a Punch-and-Judy show.
2. pleased as Punch, highly pleased; delighted: They were pleased as Punch at having been asked to come along.
[short for PUNCHINELLO]

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I
English illustrated periodical published 1841–1992 and revived in 1996 with a revised format.

Initially a weekly radical paper, it became famous for its satiric humour, caricatures, and cartoons. Among its famous early staff members were William Thackeray and John Tenniel. A cover drawing by Richard Doyle was used continuously from 1849 to 1956, when each issue's cover was made different, though the traditional figures of Punch and his dog Toby usually appeared somewhere.
II
Hooknosed, humpbacked character in marionette and puppet shows (see puppetry).

Adapted from a stock character of the commedia dell'arte, the puppet character was taken to France and England by Italian puppeteers in the 1660s. By 1700 every English puppet show featured Punch (from Punchinello) and his wife, Judy. As marionettes became less popular in the 1790s, smaller glove puppets were used in the popular Punch-and-Judy play. The hooked nose and the brutal, vindictive, and deceitful behaviour of the English Punch were established characteristics by the 19th century. In France his popularity declined during the 19th and 20th centuries, and he disappeared there as a comic figure. Puppeteers in England have carried on the tradition of Punch-and-Judy shows.

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▪ British periodical
in full  Punch, or the London Charivari 

      English illustrated periodical published from 1841 to 1992 and 1996 to 2002, famous for its satiric humour and caricatures and cartoons. The first editors, of what was then a weekly radical paper, were Henry Mayhew, Mark Lemon, and Joseph Stirling Coyne. Among the most famous early members of the staff were the authors William Makepeace Thackeray (Thackeray, William Makepeace) and Thomas Hood (Hood, Thomas) and the illustrator-cartoonists John Leech (Leech, John) and Sir John Tenniel (Tenniel, Sir John).

      The cover drawing by Richard Doyle (Doyle, Richard) was used from 1849 until 1956, when each issue's cover was made different and printed in colour, although the traditional figures of Punch and his dog Toby usually appeared somewhere. By the 1990s the magazine had lost its satiric bite and most of its readership, and it ceased publication in April 1992. It was revived in September 1996 but financial difficulties continued, and the magazine closed in May 2002.

India
also spelled  Poonch 

      town, western Jammu and Kashmir state, far northwestern India. It is situated near the line of control between the Indian- and Pakistani-administered portions of the Kashmir region. The town is connected via Haji Pir pass with Uri to the north. Agriculture (corn [maize], wheat, and rice) vies with mining (petroleum, coal, and limestone) in the economy of the region. Pop. (2001) 23,978.

▪ puppet character
in full  Punchinello , Italian  Pulcinella 

      hooknosed, humpbacked character, the most popular of marionettes and glove puppets and the chief figure in the Punch-and-Judy puppet show. Brutal, vindictive, and deceitful, he is usually at odds with authority.

      His character had roots in the Roman clown and the comic country bumpkin. More modern origins can be traced to Pulcinella, a character who appeared in the Italian (Italy) commedia dell'arte in the 17th century. It is not certain who was the first Pulcinella, although claims have been made on behalf of Silvio Fiorillo, a professional comedian who was performing at the beginning of the 17th century. In early pictorial representations, he is depicted as large, shambling, and stupid-looking, dressed in a loose white shirt and very full trousers.

      The Italian actors soon began to travel throughout Europe, bringing with them the puppet showmen. Polichinelle, the French adaptation of the character Pulcinella, became firmly established in France by the middle of the 17th century. The origin of the grotesque, humpbacked, and hooknosed marionette Polichinelle may have resulted from a fusion of the Italian character Pulcinella with an earlier French tradition of humpbacked fools.

      A similar tradition of the humpbacked fool existed in England when the first Italian puppeteers arrived after the restoration of Charles II in 1660. Two years later, the first references to Punchinello, soon shortened to Punch, appeared in the writings of the English diarist Samuel Pepys. By 1700 practically every puppet show in England featured Punch, and his wife, Judy, originally called Joan, was also a well-known figure. Traveling showmen carried these plays to country wakes (festivals) in the summer and visited London for the fairs in August and September. Early in the 18th century Punch became famous in political circles through the use of the name by Martin Powell, a marionette showman, in a scurrilous attack on Robert Harley entitled A Second Tale of a Tub (1715).

      In the 1790s the marionettes lost their popularity at the fairs. There was, however, a new interest in the humbler glove puppets, and in this form the Punch-and-Judy play became a success. Plots varied, but the principal players were Toby the Dog, the Baby, the Doctor, the Negro Servant, the Beadle, the Clown, the Hangman, the Ghost of Judy, Mr. Jones, Hector the Horse, the Crocodile, and the Devil. The hooked nose, the humped back, the tendency to wife beating and outrageous lawlessness typical of the English Punch were established characteristics by the 19th century. Punch featured in the harlequinades that accompanied 18th- and 19th-century pantomimes.

      In England in the second half of the 20th century, more than 50 professional puppeteers carried on the vigorous tradition of Punch's humour. His influence survived in such common phrases as “pleased as Punch.” His antics continued to feature domestic abuse, lawlessness, and antiauthoritarianism mixed with bald-faced misogyny despite receiving increasing criticism.

      In France the puppet Polichinelle had a similar history. His popularity, however, declined during the 19th and 20th centuries, and he has disappeared as a comic figure, being replaced by Guignol. Other puppets have developed from the same origins as Punch, such as Petrushka (Petrouchka) in Russia.

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Universalium. 2010.

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