psocid


psocid
psocine /soh"suyn, sos"uyn/, adj.
/soh"sid, sos"id/, n.
1. any of numerous minute winged insects of the family Psocidae (order Psocoptera), including most of the common barklice, having mouth parts adapted for chewing and feeding on fungi, lichens, algae, decaying plant material, etc., and occurring on the bark of trees and the leaves of plants.
2. any member of the order Psocoptera, comprising the booklice and barklice.
[1890-95; < NL Psocidae, equiv. to Psoc(us) name of a genus ( < Gk psôchos dust) + -idae -ID2]

* * *

insect
      any of a group of about 5,000 species of soft-bodied insects, usually less than 5 mm (0.2 inch) long. Its slender antennae are at least as long as its body, and wing venation is simple, with no crossveins. Mouthparts are adapted for chewing, with the upper jaw usually elongated and chisel-like. Psocids eat fungi (including molds), cereals, pollen, and organic debris.

      The best-known species, the booklouse, is a pale, wingless insect usually found indoors among old books and papers, on dusty shelves, or in cereals.

      The majority of psocids, usually called barklice, generally have four membranous wings that are held rooflike over the body when at rest. They are found on tree bark and foliage, under stones, or in ground litter.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • psocid — [sō′sid, säs′id] n. [< ModL Psocidae (< Gr psōchos, dust < psōchein, to rub small < IE base * bhes , to rub fine > SAND) + idae, IDAE] any of an order (Psocoptera) of small, winged insects with biting mouthparts, including the book …   English World dictionary

  • psocid — noun Etymology: ultimately from New Latin Psocus, genus of lice Date: 1891 any of an order (Psocoptera syn. Corrodentia) of minute usually winged primitive insects (as a book louse) having simple mouthparts …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • psocid — pso•cid [[t]ˈsoʊ sɪd, ˈsɒs ɪd[/t]] n. ent any of numerous tiny lice of the order Psocoptera, many of which are pests on woody plants and plant products, as the booklouse • Etymology: 1890–95; < NL Psocidae=Psoc(us) name of a genus (< Gk… …   From formal English to slang

  • psocid — noun small winged insect living on the bark and leaves of trees and feeding on e.g. fungi and decaying plant matter • Hypernyms: ↑psocopterous insect • Hyponyms: ↑bark louse, ↑bark louse • Member Holonyms: ↑Psocidae, ↑family Psocidae …   Useful english dictionary

  • Aix sponsa — Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] [1913 Webster] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; frequently …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Alauda arborea — Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] [1913 Webster] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; frequently …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Anemone nemorosa — Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] [1913 Webster] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; frequently …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Anobium tessellatum — Deathwatch Death watch (?; 224), n. 1. (Zo[ o]l.) (a) A small beetle ({Anobium tessellatum} and other allied species). By forcibly striking its head against woodwork it makes a ticking sound, which is a call of the sexes to each other, but has… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • book lice — Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] [1913 Webster] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; frequently …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bridal duck — Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] [1913 Webster] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; frequently …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.