procurator


procurator
procuratorate, procuratorship, n.procuratorial /prok'yeuhr euh tawr"ee euhl, -tohr"-/, procuratory, adj.
/prok"yeuh ray'teuhr/, n.
1. Rom. Hist. any of various imperial officials with fiscal or administrative powers.
2. a cellarer.
3. a person, as a deputy, attorney, or agent, employed to manage the affairs of another.
[1250-1300; ME < L procurator manager. See PROCURATION, -TOR]

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▪ ancient Roman official
Latin  Procurator , plural  Procuratores 

      government financial agent in ancient Rome. From the reign of the emperor Augustus (27 BC–AD 14), procurators were regularly appointed to official posts in the imperial administration of the provinces or in the departments of the imperial government concerning such matters as the grain supply, the mint, and the mines. Procurators of provinces supervised imperial finances in their respective jurisdictions. In imperial provinces the procurator served under a legate; in senatorial provinces he exercised more authority within the administration of the governor and his quaestor.

      Procurators were also appointed to govern, with small troop detachments, certain lesser provinces. These procurators exercised both financial and judicial authority, even in capital cases, but were usually subject to the general authority of the governor of a major province in the region. In the 4th century AD the office was renamed rationalis.

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Universalium. 2010.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Procurator — • A person who manages the affairs of another by virtue of a charge received from him. Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Procurator     Procurator      …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • procurator — PROCURATÓR, procuratori, s.m. 1. Magistrat roman, ales de obicei dintre liberţi, însărcinat cu strângerea dărilor şi cu conducerea provinciilor imperiale. 2. Înalt demnitar în republicile Veneţiei şi Genovei, în evul mediu. 3. Persoană care… …   Dicționar Român

  • Procurator — may refer to:In Historical uses * Promagistrate, an appointed position in the Roman Republic by the Senate, acting in place of a curator * Roman Procurators of Judaea Province, 44 132 AD * Procurator (Teutonic Knights), a function in the Monastic …   Wikipedia

  • PROCURATOR — PROCURATOR, title of the governors (first over Judea, later over most of Palestine) appointed by Rome during the years 6–41 and 44–66 C.E. From a recently discovered inscription in which pontius pilate is mentioned, it appears that the title of… …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • Procurator — Proc u*ra tor, n. [L.: cf. F. procurateur. See {Procure}, and cf. {Proctor}. ] [1913 Webster] 1. (Law) One who manages another s affairs, either generally or in a special matter; an agent; a proctor. Chaucer. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. (Rom. Antiq.) …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • procurator — I noun administrator, adviser, agent, appointee, assistant, broker, business representative, caretaker, conductor, curator, delegate, deputy, director, emissary, envoy, executor, factor, go between, intendant, intermediary, intermediate,… …   Law dictionary

  • procurator — ► NOUN Law 1) an agent representing others in a court in countries retaining Roman civil law. 2) (in Scotland) a lawyer practising before the lower courts. ORIGIN Latin procurator administrator, finance agent …   English terms dictionary

  • procurator — [präk′yo͞o rāt΄ər, präk′yərät΄ər] n. [ME procuratour < OFr < L procurator < procurare: see PROCURE] 1. an official of ancient Rome who managed the financial affairs of a province or acted as governor of a lesser province 2. a person… …   English World dictionary

  • Procurator — (lat.), 1) Verwalter, Aufseher, im römischen Privatleben der Hausverwalter, welcher die Aufsicht über das Hauswesen u. die Sklaven hatte; 2) zur Kaiserzeit in den kaiserlichen Provinzen diejenigen, welche statt der früheren Quästoren die… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Procurator — Procurator, s. Prokurator …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Procurator — Procurator, Stellvertreter, Statthalter (zur röm. Kaiserzeit) …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon


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