probation


probation
probational, probationary /proh bay"sheuh ner'ee/, adj.probationship, n.
/proh bay"sheuhn/, n.
1. the act of testing.
2. the testing or trial of a person's conduct, character, qualifications, or the like.
3. the state or period of such testing or trial.
4. Law.
a. a method of dealing with offenders, esp. young persons guilty of minor crimes or first offenses, by allowing them to go at large under supervision of a probation officer.
b. the state of having been conditionally released.
5. Educ. a trial period or condition of students in certain educational institutions who are being permitted to redeem failures, misconduct, etc.
6. the testing or trial of a candidate for membership in a religious body or order, for holy orders, etc.
7. Archaic. proof.
[1375-1425; late ME probacion < L probation- (s. of probatio). See PROBATE, -ION]

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Conditional suspension of an offender's sentence upon the promise of good behaviour and agreement to accept supervision and abide by specified requirements.

It differs from parole in that the offender is not required to serve any of his sentence. Those convicted of serious offenses and those previously convicted of other offenses are usually not considered for probation. Studies in several countries show that 70 to 80% of probationers successfully complete their probation; additional limited evidence suggests that recidivism may be less than 30%.

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      correctional method under which the sentences of selected offenders may be conditionally suspended upon the promise of good behaviour and agreement to accept supervision and abide by specified requirements. Probation is distinct from parole, which involves conditional release from confinement after part of a sentence has already been served.

      The probation process for an adult begins with a pre-sentence investigation of the offender after guilt has been established. Statutes commonly exclude from consideration persons convicted of serious offenses, such as armed robbery or murder, or persons previously convicted of other offenses.

      When probation is ordered by the court, the offender is placed under the supervision of a probation officer, or a person appointed by the court, with the conditions of probation specified in the court order. Typically, these require that the probationer conduct himself properly, maintain his local residence, report regularly to his probation officer, support his family, pay restitution, avoid criminal associations and disreputable places, and abstain from drinking. Though these conditions may effect the rehabilitation of an individual, they have been criticized by some as requiring the guilty to tread a narrower path than the average citizen.

      Early discharge by the court in recognition of good conduct is a common practice. If the probationer violates the terms of his probation or commits a further offense during the period, he may be brought back before the court for revision or revocation of the original order of probation. Studies made in several countries show that 70 to 80 percent of all probationers successfully fulfill the terms of probation and are discharged. Limited evidence suggests that the proportion of former probationers convicted of subsequent offenses is small, probably fewer than 3 in 10.

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Universalium. 2010.

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Look at other dictionaries:

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