privy council


privy council
privy councilor.
1. a board or select body of personal advisers, as of a sovereign.
2. (caps.) (in Great Britain) a body of persons who advise the sovereign in matters of state, the majority of members being selected by the prime minister.
3. (sometimes caps.) any similar body, as one appointed to assist the governor of a British dominion.
[1250-1300; ME prive counseil privy counsel]

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Historically, the British sovereign's private council.

Once powerful, the Privy Council has long ceased to be an active body, having lost most of its judicial and political functions since the middle of the 17th century. It grew out of the medieval curia (curia regis), which comprised the king's tenants in chief, household officials, and other advisers. The curia performed all the functions of government in either small groups, which became the king's council, or large groups, which grew into the great council and Parliament. It now is chiefly concerned with issuing royal charters, conducting government research, and serving as an appeals body for ecclesiastical and other lesser courts. See also prerogative court.

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▪ United Kingdom government
      historically, the British sovereign's private council. Once powerful, the Privy Council has long ceased to be an active body, having lost most of its judicial and political functions since the middle of the 17th century. This atrophy was a result of the decline of the sovereign's responsibility for political decisions as power moved from the monarch to the prime minister and the cabinet. In modern times, meetings of the Privy Council are held for the making of formal decisions.

      The Privy Council is descended from the curia Regis, which was made up of the king's tenants in chief, household officials, and other advisers. This group performed all the functions of government in either small groups, which became the king's council, or large groups, which grew into the great council and Parliament.

      By the time of the reign of Henry VII (1485–1509), the king's council had become the instrument of the crown; it was made up of the Privy Council, the prerogative courts (prerogative court) of Chancery (Chancery, Court of), Star Chamber (Star Chamber, Court of), and High Commission (High Commission, Court of), and their local subsidiaries.

      The council system worked well as long as the king was capable of choosing the right men and providing leadership. The kings from the house of Stuart (Stuart, House of) were unable to do this, and jealousy and anger at the council's political activities grew among parliamentarians and common lawyers. Amid the religious and constitutional controversies of the mid-17th century, the council system was swept away, but the Privy Council was never formally abolished. It was revived under Charles II (1660–85), but after that the crown increasingly turned to the cabinet. An attempt to return the Privy Council to power was made in the Act of Settlement of 1701 (Hanoverian Succession), but it proved futile.

      From the time of the accession of George I (1714–27), the Privy Council became a purely formal body meeting to transact formal business. By 1960 there were more than 300 members, mostly dignitaries who held or had held high political, judicial, or ecclesiastical office, along with an occasional eminent person in science or letters.

      There is, however, a Privy Council office, with the lord president of the council as responsible minister. It is concerned with the making of orders in council and issuing royal charters, chiefly to municipal corporations and to charitable bodies engaged in education, research, and the encouragement of literature, science, and the arts. The council bears the main responsibility for research through the department of scientific and industrial research. Usually it functions through committees, the most noteworthy being the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, which was established by statute and hears appeals from ecclesiastical courts, prize courts (prize court), and courts from the colonies as well as some independent members of the Commonwealth.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Privy council — Privy Priv y, a. [F. priv[ e], fr. L. privatus. See {Private}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Of or pertaining to some person exclusively; assigned to private uses; not public; private; as, the privy purse. Privee knights and squires. Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Privy council — Council Coun cil (koun s[i^]l), n. [F. concile, fr. L. concilium; con + calare to call, akin to Gr. ??? to call, and E. hale, v., haul. Cf. {Conciliate}. This word is often confounded with counsel, with which it has no connection.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Privy Council —   [ prɪvɪ kaʊnsl] der, , in Großbritannien der Geheime Staatsrat des Monarchen. Er hat seine Anfänge im 14. Jahrhundert; größte Bedeutung erlangte er im Mittelalter und in der Tudorzeit. Mitglieder (rd. 300) werden gegenwärtig alle… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Privy Council — n the Privy Council a group of important people in Britain who advise the king or queen on political affairs >Privy Councillor n …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Privy Council — index bench Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 Privy Council …   Law dictionary

  • Privy Council — (engl., spr. priwwĭ kaunßil), s. Council und Großbritannien, S. 374; Privy Councillor, geheimer Staatsrat, Mitglied des P. C …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Privy Council — ► NOUN ▪ a body of advisers appointed by a sovereign or a Governor General. DERIVATIVES privy counsellor (also privy councillor) noun …   English terms dictionary

  • privy council — n. a body of advisors or confidential counselors appointed by or serving a ruler, esp. a monarch privy councilor n …   English World dictionary

  • Privy Council — Privy Council, s. Council …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Privy Council — (engl., spr. Priwwi Kaunßil), der Geheime Rath, eine der höchsten Behörden von Großbritannien, s.d. S. 677 C) …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon


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