Post-Impressionism


Post-Impressionism
Post-Impressionist, adj., n.Post-Impressionistic, adj.
/pohst'im presh"euh niz'euhm/, n.
a varied development of Impressionism by a group of painters chiefly between 1880 and 1900 stressing formal structure, as with Cézanne and Seurat, or the expressive possibilities of form and color, as with Van Gogh and Gauguin.
[1905-10; POST- + IMPRESSIONISM]

* * *

Movement in Western painting that represented both an extension of Impressionism and a rejection of its limitations.

The term was coined by Roger Fry for the works of Paul Cézanne, Georges Seurat, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, and others. Most of these painters first pursued Impressionism, a style based, in its strictest sense, on the objective recording of nature in terms of the fugitive effects of colour and light. The Post-Impressionists rejected this aim in favour of more ambitious expression, admitting their debt, however, to the pure, brilliant colours of Impressionism, its freedom from traditional subject matter, and its technique of defining form with short brushstrokes of broken colour. Each painter in the movement pursued unique, personal subject matter and, while sharing stylistic goals with the other Post-Impressionists, had a personal form of expression. For example, Cézanne abandoned the Impressionists' virtuoso depiction of evanescent light effects in order to pursue his preoccupation with the underlying structures of natural forms and the problem of unifying surface patterns with spatial depth. Both Gauguin and van Gogh rejected the indifferent objectivity of Impressionism in favour of a more personal, spiritual expression. The Post-Impressionists often exhibited together but, unlike the Impressionists, who were a close-knit and convivial group, they painted mainly alone. In general, Post-Impressionism led away from a naturalistic approach and toward the two major movements of early 20th-century art that followed it: Cubism and Fauvism. See also Neo-Impressionism.

* * *

art
      in Western painting, movement in France that represented both an extension of Impressionism and a rejection of that style's inherent limitations. The term Post-Impressionism was coined by the English art critic Roger Fry (Fry, Roger) for the work of such late 19th-century painters as Paul Cézanne, Georges Seurat, Paul Gauguin (Gauguin, Paul), Vincent van Gogh (Gogh, Vincent van), Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri de), and others. All of these painters except van Gogh were French, and most of them began as Impressionists (Impressionism); each of them abandoned the style, however, to form his own highly personal art. Impressionism was based, in its strictest sense, on the objective recording of nature in terms of the fugitive effects of colour and light. The Post-Impressionists rejected this limited aim in favour of more ambitious expression, admitting their debt, however, to the pure, brilliant colours of Impressionism, its freedom from traditional subject matter, and its technique of defining form with short brushstrokes of broken colour. The work of these painters formed a basis for several contemporary trends and for early 20th-century modernism.

      After a phase of uneasy dissension among the Impressionists, Paul Cézanne (Cézanne, Paul) withdrew from the movement in 1878 in order “to make of Impressionism something solid and durable like the art of the museums.” In contrast to the passing show depicted by the Impressionists, his approach imbued landscape and still life with a monumental permanence and coherence. He abandoned the Impressionists' virtuoso depiction of evanescent light effects in his preoccupation with the underlying structures of natural forms and the problem of unifying surface patterns with spatial depth. His art was the major inspiration for Cubism, which was concerned primarily with depicting the structure of objects. In 1884, at the Salon des Indépendants in Paris, Georges Seurat (Seurat, Georges) revealed an intention similar to Cézanne's with paintings that showed more attention to composition than did those of the Impressionists and that delved into the science of colour. Taking as a point of departure the Impressionist practice of using broken colour to suggest shimmering light, he sought to achieve luminosity through optical formulas, placing side by side tiny dots of contrasting colours chosen to blend from a distance into a dominant colour. This extremely theoretical technique, called pointillism, was adopted by a number of contemporary painters and formed the basis of the style of painting known as Neo-Impressionism.

 The Post-Impressionists often exhibited together, but, unlike the Impressionists, who began as a close-knit, convivial group, they painted mainly alone. Cézanne painted in isolation at Aix-en-Provence in southern France; his solitude was matched by that of Paul Gauguin (Gauguin, Paul), who in 1891 took up residence in Tahiti, and of van Gogh, who painted in the countryside at Arles. Both Gauguin and van Gogh rejected the indifferent objectivity of Impressionism in favour of a more personal, spiritual expression. After exhibiting with the Impressionists in 1886, Gauguin renounced “the abominable error of naturalism.” With the young painter Émile Bernard (Bernard, Émile), Gauguin sought a simpler truth and purer aesthetic in art; turning away from the sophisticated, urban art world of Paris, he instead looked for inspiration in rural communities with more traditional values. Copying the pure, flat colour, heavy outline, and decorative quality of medieval stained glass and manuscript illumination, the two artists explored the expressive potential of pure colour and line, Gauguin especially using exotic and sensuous colour harmonies to create poetic images of the Tahitians among whom he would eventually live. Arriving in Paris in 1886, the Dutch painter van Gogh (Gogh, Vincent van) quickly adapted Impressionist techniques and colour to express his acutely felt emotions. He transformed the contrasting short brushstrokes of Impressionism into curving, vibrant lines of colour, exaggerated even beyond Impressionist brilliance, that convey his emotionally charged and ecstatic responses to the natural landscape.

      Less closely connected with the Impressionists were Toulouse-Lautrec (Toulouse-Lautrec, Henri de) and Odilon Redon (Redon, Odilon). Concerned with perceptive portraiture and decorative effect, Toulouse-Lautrec used the vivid contrasting colours of Impressionism in flat areas enclosed by a distinct, sinuous outline. Redon's still-life florals were somewhat Impressionistic, but his other works, featuring evocative and often mystical subject matter, are more linear and closer to Symbolism in style. In general, Post-Impressionism led away from a naturalistic approach and toward the two major movements of early 20th-century art that superseded it: Cubism and Fauvism, which sought to evoke emotion through colour and line.

Additional Reading
A major source on the movement is John Rewald, Post-Impressionism: From Van Gogh to Gauguin, 3rd ed., rev. (1978). Other important overviews are John House and Mary Anne Stevens (eds.), Post-Impressionism: Cross-Currents in European and American Painting (1979); and Bernard Denvir, Post-Impressionism (1992). Martha Kapos (ed.), The Post-Impressionists: A Retrospective (1993), provides a general study as well as extracts from important sources and documents related to the movement.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Post-impressionism — Post im*pres sion*ism, n. (Painting) In the broadest sense, the theory or practice of any of several groups of painters of the early 1900 s, or of these groups taken collectively, whose work and theories have in common a tendency to reaction… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • post-impressionism — 1910, from POST (Cf. post ) + impressionism (see IMPRESSIONIST (Cf. impressionist)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • post-Impressionism — ► NOUN ▪ a late 19th century and early 20th century style of art in which colour, line, and form were used to express the emotional response of the artist. DERIVATIVES post Impressionist noun & adjective …   English terms dictionary

  • Post-Impressionism — Infobox Painting| title=The Centenary of Independence (Le centenaire de l indépendance) artist=Henri Rousseau year=1892 type=Oil on canvas height=57 width=110 height inch=22.4 width inch =43.3 museum=Presently in the Getty Museum in Los… …   Wikipedia

  • Post-Impressionism — Post Im•pres•sion•ism [[t]ˌpoʊst ɪmˈprɛʃ əˌnɪz əm[/t]] n. fia (sometimes l.c.) a varied development of Impressionism by a group of painters, chiefly between 1880 and 1900, stressing formal structure or the possibilities of form and color •… …   From formal English to slang

  • Post-Impressionism — n. artistic aims and methods developed as a reaction against impressionism and intending to express the individual artist s conception of the objects represented rather than the ordinary observer s view. Derivatives: post impressionist n. & adj.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • post-Impressionism — noun the work or style of a group of late 19th century and early 20th century artists who reacted against the naturalism of the Impressionists, using colour, line, and form to express the emotional response of the artist. Derivatives post… …   English new terms dictionary

  • post-impressionism — /poʊst ɪmˈprɛʃənɪzəm/ (say pohst im preshuhnizuhm) noun a movement in modern painting about 1870–1920, which rejected the impressionists imitation of natural forms in favour of other forms, but accepted their use of pure colour as a means of… …   Australian English dictionary

  • Impressionism — was a 19th century art movement that began as a loose association of Paris based artists exhibiting their art publicly in the 1860s. The name of the movement is derived from the title of a Claude Monet work, Impression, Sunrise (Impression,… …   Wikipedia

  • post — post·abdomen; post·absorptive; post·age; post·al·ly; post; post·anoxic; post·antennal; post·arteriolar; post·atomic; post·audit; post·axial; post·bellum; post·brachium; post·branchial; post·breeding; post·canonical; post·cardinal; post·cava;… …   English syllables


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.